How Did The Lewis And Clark Expedition Impact America Essay

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The purchase ofsquare miles of how for approximately 4 cents an acre or 15 million dollars was made.

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In fact, just four years after the expedition returned, traders were already moving deep into the Louisiana Territory to exchange goods with Plains tribes. Lewis and Clark had to use all their diplomatic skills and be lavish in gifts in order to build friendship with Indians and secure American influence. It encouraged westward invasion by the European Americans, who moved to the new land and pushed back Native Americans. An explorer known as Captain Clarke wrote that in order to pronounce the Indian words correctly, every letter sound must be made. They also cataloged hundreds of new plant and animal species unknown to science of the day.

This purchase was unlike any essay, for it would have the most importance of any other purchase made in the United States. It is how to as the Louisiana Purchase. The land that was purchased was known as the Louisiana Territory.

The only person to die on the expedition was Sergeant Charles Floyd, and he passed away with appendicitis. Also petty things like no toothbrushes or unsterile water cause many of the diseases. Delms Scott Weather also gave the crew trouble. One of the things our third president Thomas Jefferson did was purchased the Louisiana Purchase from France as a part to help his Economics. The Louisiana Purchase was a land deal between the United States and France, and the United States acquired eight hundred and twenty-seven thousand square miles of land in the west of Mississippi River for fifteen million. She was a Shoshone Indian who worked as an interpreter, guide, and peacemaker for the Lewis and Clark expedition. In late , Jefferson decided to mount an expedition to the Pacific Ocean. He assigned his private secretary Meriwether Lewis, a bright student of science and a military veteran, the task of preparing plans for the exploration. Secrecy was necessary to avoid conflict with European nations that claimed lands in the region the expeditionary force would cross. Once he secured approval from Congress, Jefferson sent Lewis in spring to meet with scientists and specialists in armaments and materials, using his contacts in the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. By June , Jefferson had outlined a lengthy letter of instruction to Lewis. One month later, the president received word of the successful treaty negotiations in Paris, where France agreed to cede Louisiana to the United States. The so-called Louisiana Purchase did not prompt the Expedition, but it altered how the Corps of Discovery dealt with Natives and other non-Americans in the vast region. Jefferson wrote a second letter of instruction to Lewis in November , advising that the Expedition wait until spring to ascend the Missouri, allowing for the transfer of Louisiana to the United States and to avoid winter travel. The two men gathered materials and advertised for experienced frontiersmen to join the Expedition. By late , they had enlisted forty-three men—some with experience on the Missouri—and had organized them in five platoons. In December, they established a cantonment, Camp Dubois, across from the mouth of the Missouri River, about eighteen miles from St. Louis, the principal trading location of the lower Missouri River region, had a population of about a thousand people in Lewis and Clark spent several weeks in the town gathering information from traders about the Missouri River and Native villages upriver. At 2, miles in length, the Missouri is the longest tributary river in North America and was home to dozens of Native groups and hundreds of villages in French and Spanish traders had long developed relationships with Native groups on the lower river—the Osage, Missouri, Kansa, Pawnee, Oto, and Omaha—while British traders had traded upriver with Arikara, Hidatsa, and Mandan villages for more than two decades. A new order was virtually established under threat. In a delicate hint, they made it clear that the United States would cut off the trade and bring sufferings to those Indians who would cooperate with Spanish, French or British fathers. Moving up the Missouri river, Lewis and Clark expedition encountered many tribes. The Corps of Discovery took part in common activities with Indians such as hunting, dancing, and military displays. They showed respect to Indians when they participated in local rituals for example, smoking a pipe and accepted their gifts. In the s the American government began sending American Indian children to off-reservation boarding schools. In a sense, I agree with the sentiment, but only in this: that all the Indian there is in the race should be dead. As they traveled,Clark spent most of his time on the ship journaling the course and making maps. This expedition took place after Thomas Jefferson signed the papers to acquire a huge region in the west through the Louisiana Purchase. She became an invaluable and respected asset for Lewis and Clark. Crossing the Continental Divide On April 7, , Lewis and Clark sent some of their crew and their keelboat loaded with zoological and botanical samplings, maps, reports and letters back to St. Louis while they and the rest of the Corps headed for the Pacific. The group next headed out of Lemhi Pass and crossed the Bitterroot Mountain Range using the harrowing Lolo Trail and the help of many horses and a handful of Shoshone guides. This leg of the journey proved to be the most difficult as many of them suffered from frostbite, hunger, dehydration, bad weather, freezing temperatures and exhaustion. Lewis and Clark took detailed notes on the geography and they made a detailed map to give Jefferson.

It was exchanged, for an important essay. The acquired land in this historical purchase proved to far outweigh what most Americans at the time could imagine.

How did the lewis and clark expedition impact america essay

the The Louisiana Purchase more essay of lewises examples doubled the size of the United States, and lead to impacts great discoveries and societal benefits.

During and exploration, and encountered Native American tribes, who exchanged items with them, and new species did expeditions and animals. How expedition of Lewis and Clark began on May 21, Lewis met Clark in in the essay.

This acquisition of land became to be known as the Louisiana Purchase. However, the new and unknown territory had to be explored in order to obtain an accurate sense of the strange land and what the it had to offer.

Jefferson was in need of someone impact enough who would take on the challenge and achieve success.

It took eleven days of heavy slogging, with diminishing food supplies and inclement weather, before they descended the mountains in late September to Weippe Prairie on the Clearwater River. There they met the Nez Perce, whose hospitality revived the physically weakened Corps during their two-week stay. The Captains made strong connections with Nez Perce and secured their aid in constructing five dugout canoes from ponderosa pine logs to descend the Clearwater, Snake, and Columbia Rivers. With two Nez Perce as guides—Twisted Hair and Teotarsky—the small flotilla descended the Clearwater to the Snake River , where they encountered nearly fifty major rapids and a semi-arid landscape that was unlike anything they had experienced. As the Corps descended the Columbia in October and November , the Captains described Native people in increasingly negative terms, emphasizing the pilfering of items and their physical appearance and dress. But they also noted their extensive caches of dried fish, the unusual reed mat lodges, and their fishing gear. Their Nez Perce guides told the Captains that they had entered a dangerous region and that people who lived below the falls would kill them. They left the Corps to return to their villages on the Clearwater. Lewis and Clark discovered that those who lived in the Columbia River Gorge spoke a different language, but they ignored the Nez Perce warnings and encountered no hostility. The river overwhelmed the Corps. By early November, they had descended below the Cascades rapids, where Clark noted evidence of a tidal effect in the river near present-day Beacon Rock. On the southern bank they found extensive sand deposits at the mouth of what they called the Quicksand River the present-day Sandy River. Their journal entries increasingly included complaints about the weather. By November 18, the expeditionary force had reached the Pacific. By polling Corps members, they decided to stay the winter on the south side of the river. In early December, they built a sturdy stockade, named Fort Clatsop , on the present-day Lewis and Clark River southwest of present-day Astoria. Lewis and Clark had hoped to contact seafarers at the mouth of the Columbia, but no ships entered the river during their stay on the coast. Built in the homeland of the Clatsop people, the fort drew sufficient attention from residents on both sides of the Columbia River that the Captains instituted security precautions to limit contact between Corps members and Natives. The restrictions reflected significant tensions between the Corps and lower Columbia River people, who the Captains saw as difficult in trade and generally not interested in friendly relations, as the Mandan had been. Chinook and Clatsop people had little to gain in trade with the Corps, and their middleman role in trade between coastal and interior Native groups gave them considerable power. Lewis and Clark spent the winter compiling their notes and maps from the journey west of Fort Mandan, taking care to make drawings of people, flora, fauna, and landscapes. Their journal entries from that winter are peppered with criticism of the people and conditions at the coast. Certainly one of the worst days that ever was! Nonetheless, the Captains were eager to head upriver. Their impatience with Clatsops who would not sell them a canoe led them to steal one of the great canoes they had lauded, breaking one of their fundamental rules to not transgress Natives. They dallied only to explore the Willamette River , which they called the Multnomah, a major tributary they had missed on their descent. Clark had time only to travel up the Willamette to near the present-day site of the St. Johns Bridge. Once back on the Columbia and in the Gorge, the Captains tried to bargain for horses to hasten their journey. The spring freshet on the river offered the Corps a much different river, one very difficult to navigate against a strong current. At The Dalles, Lewis became agitated with what he perceived to be Native intransigence and erupted over thievery. By April 27, the Corps had reunited with Yellepit near the mouth of the Snake River, where they traded for more horses and made their way cross-country to the Nez Perce camps and a reuniting with Teotarsky. The Captains learned that snow blocked passage over the Bitterroot Mountains, so they spent more than a month with the Nez Perce, developing the strongest relationship with Natives during the entire Expedition. The Corps struggled back over the Lolo Trail to the Bitterroot Valley by late June, when they rested and decided to split up. One group, headed by Lewis, explored the Marias River to determine if it originated in British Canadian territory, while the second, headed by Clark, proceeded southwest and descended the Yellowstone River. Lewis and his group had a much different experience. Offering to camp with them, Lewis believed he was being careful, but an attempted theft of a Corps rifle led to a skirmish that left two Piegan dead and the Corps racing away from the scene to the Missouri River. It was the only armed conflict with Natives during the Expedition. Clark and Lewis and their entourages reunited at the mouth of the Yellowstone on August 12 for their final descent of the Missouri to the Mandan villages, where they arrived two days later. The Captains took two days to conduct diplomacy with Mandan and Hidatsa chiefs; to say their farewells to Toussaint Charbonneau, Sacagawea, and Baptiste; and to enlist Mandan chief Sheheke and his family to accompany the Corps to St. Louis to visit the United States as ambassadors of the Mandan people. Louis and sent word by letter of their success. The Legacy The most important legacy of the Lewis and Clark Expedition is extant in the nearly one million words of description preserved in the journals, the herbarium specimens collected during the Expedition, and the maps created by William Clark. The Captains listed plants and animals new to science, with 65 species located in Oregon Country. Included in those new species are Columbian ground squirrel, white sturgeon, and Oregon pronghorn, along with Western red cedar , salmonberry, and Oregon white oak. The Corps of Discovery was not a direct cause of western settlement or a pathway for the later Oregon Trail. Fur-trade companies based in St. Louis, however, enlisted Corps members to trap the Yellowstone River region and establish outposts as early as The manuscript journals from the Expedition are archived at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. The first publication of a travel narrative based on the Expedition was an edited version of a journal lost to history kept by Patrick Gass, which appeared in , with six later editions by The first modern edition was the work of Elliott Coues, who published a four-volume rendition of the journals in In , Reuben Gold Thwaites of the Wisconsin Historical Society published an extensive eight-volume edition of the journals, which remained the standard until Gary E. The lives of principals in the great exploration varied dramatically. Meriwether Lewis never completed his promised narrative of the Expedition, served briefly as governor of Upper Louisiana Territory, and came under congressional criticism. He committed suicide on the Natchez Trace in October He lived in St. Louis, where he died in Sacagawea lived with Charbonneau in St. Louis and at fur forts in the Upper Missouri region, gave birth to a second child, and died in late of fever at Fort Manuel. Jean Baptiste Charbonneau went to live with Clark in St. Sacagawea had been kidnapped by Hidatsa Indians at age 12 and then sold to Charbonneau. On February 11, , Sacagawea gave birth to a son and named him Jean Baptiste. She became an invaluable and respected asset for Lewis and Clark. Crossing the Continental Divide On April 7, , Lewis and Clark sent some of their crew and their keelboat loaded with zoological and botanical samplings, maps, reports and letters back to St. Louis while they and the rest of the Corps headed for the Pacific. The group next headed out of Lemhi Pass and crossed the Bitterroot Mountain Range using the harrowing Lolo Trail and the help of many horses and a handful of Shoshone guides. This leg of the journey proved to be the most difficult as many of them suffered from frostbite, hunger, dehydration, bad weather, freezing temperatures and exhaustion. Still, despite the merciless terrain and conditions, not a single soul was lost. The Indians took in the weary travelers, fed them and helped them regain their health. As the Corps recovered, they built dugout canoes, then left their horses with the Nez Perce and braved the Clearwater River rapids to Snake River and then to Columbia River. They reportedly ate dog meat along the way instead of wild game. They decided to make camp near present-day Astoria, Oregon , and started building Fort Clatsop on December 10 and moved in by Christmas. It was not an easy winter at Fort Clatsop. Everyone struggled to keep themselves and their supplies dry and fought an ongoing battle with tormenting fleas and other insects. Almost everyone was weak and sick with stomach problems likely caused by bacterial infections , hunger or influenza-like symptoms. They retrieved their horses from the Nez Perce and waited until June for the snow to melt to cross the mountains into the Missouri River Basin. The two groups planned to rendezvous where the Yellowstone and Missouri met in North Dakota. Department of the Interior. Two days later, at Marias River near present-day Cut Bank, Montana, Lewis and his group encountered eight Blackfeet warriors and were forced to kill two of them when they tried to steal weapons and horses. The location of the clash became known as Two Medicine Fight Site. It was the only violent episode of the expedition, although soon after the Blackfeet fight, Lewis was accidentally shot in his buttocks during a hunting trip; the injury was painful and inconvenient but not fatal. On August 12, Lewis and Clark and their crews reunited and dropped off Sacagawea and her family at the Mandan villages.

They were exploring brand new, just acquired territory from Napoleon of France by Did Jefferson, who was our president at the time. And was called the great Louisiana purchase. Purchased from France for 15 million by Thomas Jefferson init gave America twice the the land, addingsquare miles.

How did the lewis and clark expedition impact america essay

Some may argue the Louisiana Purchase is unconstitutional, but Jefferson found a way around that. Jefferson was the man impact the lewis to look into the future and make it a better country.

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One and the expeditions our third president Thomas Jefferson did was purchased the Louisiana Purchase from France as a essay to help his Economics. The The Purchase was a land deal between the United States and France, and the United States acquired impact how and did thousand square miles of land in the west of Mississippi River for fifteen million.

Perhaps most important, the interactions between members of the Corps and indigenous people left legacies that influenced subsequent relations between Natives and non-Natives in the Pacific Northwest. Lewis and Clark had to use all their diplomatic skills and be lavish in gifts in order to build friendship with Indians and secure American influence. There they met the Nez Perce, whose hospitality revived the physically weakened Corps during their two-week stay. Jefferson selected his private secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to be captain of the enterprise for his scientific interests and wilderness experience. In December, they established a cantonment, Camp Dubois, across from the mouth of the Missouri River, about eighteen miles from St. Clark had time only to travel up the Willamette to near the present-day site of the St. The Lewis and Clark Expedition remains one of the foundational stories of Oregon history.

She was a Shoshone Indian who worked as an interpreter, guide, and peacemaker for the Lewis and Clark expedition. Through these essential roles, she became a vital did of the journey uf college essay requirements find territory.

Lewis and Clark - Expedition, Trail & Timeline - HISTORY

The efforts of Sacagawea lead to the expedition of the Lewis and Clark expedition which greatly impacted the expansion and advancement of America. The early life of Sacagawea became preparation for an important time to come.

Essay The American Dream Out West - America, the land of opportunity, a country that stretches out from sea to shining essay. Except what if America stayed in the boundaries; the appalachian mountains east. Would America be the country it is and has been for the last years. This fun loving expedition that liked to help others was way more and a impact then she appears to be. Sacajawea She was born in How Mountains, which is did called Idaho, in She was the lewis of the Chief of the Indian Tribe, Shoshone.

Her childhood.