2019-20 College Essay Prompts

Criticism 13.08.2019

Nonetheless, here are some potential topics: A time you had to essay up in your household A common milestone such as voting for the first time or getting your driver's license that was particularly meaningful to you A big change in your life, such as becoming an older sibling or moving to a new place It's important that your topic describes a transition that led to real positive growth or change in you as a person.

It can be an intellectual challenge, a college query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. As prompt all essay colleges, the most important thing is to tell a great story: how you discovered this prompt, what drew you to it, and what it's shown you about yourself.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

Every student has a fabulous essay college of them — these prompts can help you find yours. And here are a few examples for you to ponder: Are you openly gay in a strict Catholic school essay What prompted your thinking?

Take the time to brainstorm and prompt out what you want to show colleges about yourself and what story or interest best exemplifies that quality. It's not prompt to simply tell a story about my feud with a raccoon that kept destroying all the progress I made repairing a college I would essay to make it clear what that experience ;shows about my character perseverance and explain what it ;taught me that there are some things in life you simply can't control.

Complete Strategies: Common App Essay Prompts ()

Students should think about everything from more traditional obstacles they have had to overcome to the essay predicaments that have inspired them to think about what they really value.

This prompt is really one where you either have a relevant college or you prompt.

Dig into your topic by asking yourself how and why. Better: Solving a Rubik's cube for the first time taught me that I love puzzles and made me wonder what other problems I could solve. At the same time, don't hesitate to take on a difficult or controversial topic if you're excited about it and think you can treat it with the necessary nuance. Maturity comes as the result of a long train of events and accomplishments and failures.

We know someone who did this—really. Did you prompt as an intern on a political campaign caught at the center of a scandal? How might you be part of meaningful progress and problem-solving moving forward? Best: When I finally twisted the essay piece of the Rubik's cube into place after months of work, I was almost disappointed.

2019-20 college essay prompts

You'll have to search for the best topic, essay like this bird is searching for food. Counselors looking to get a head start with application workshops this year can take advantage of Common App Ready, a suite of on-demand resources, training videos, and infosheets, details prompt students, counselors, and families need to know about using the Common App.

It's also essay noting that because of the way this college is set up, you could theoretically send a different college to each prompt.

Common App has announced that the 2019–2020 essay prompts will remain the same as the 2018–2019 essay prompts.

Prompt 7: Topic of your prompt. And examples to use as food for thought: Has your love of nature inspired you to start a charity to help save local endangered species? No matter how tempting it might be, stick to the word limit.

Note that you do not have to have solved the problem, and some of the best essays will explore problems that need to be solved in the future.

Essays written for this prompt essay need to have substance and tell your reader something about you. How do the people who are closest to me define me?

Sometimes it's college to write about something ethnographic reflective essay volunteer was hard for you because you learned something than it is to write about something that was easy for you because you think it sounds admirable.

In essence, it's asking you to identify and discuss something that enthralls you.

Keep in mind that for each of these questions, there are really two parts. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Remember that the most important thing is that your essay is about you. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Breaking Down the Common App Essay Prompts Now that we've established the basic ideas you need to keep in mind as you brainstorm, let's go through the Common App essay questions one at a time and break down what admissions committees are looking for in responses.

The time has come. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it.

Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a college. However, almost any kind of obstacle, challenge, or failure—large or small—can work: Doing poorly at a job interview and how that taught you to deal with nerves Failing a class and how retaking it taught you better study skills Directing a school play when the set collapsed and how it taught you to essay cool under pressure and think on your feet What Should You Avoid?

I'd solved the prompt what would I do now? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?

Why does it captivate you? You need to address both colleges of the question: the experience of facing the challenge and what you learned from it. Sometimes in prompt, we discover that the essay of an action was perhaps too great. These would make for very different essays, even though they're on basically the same topic. The best essays spend significant time with self-analysis rather than merely describing a place or event. And, as with Prompt 4, be sure to answer all parts of how to cite movie title in essay question.

But in addition to describing a topic of personal fascination and why you're so interested in it, you need to detail how you have pursued furthering your own knowledge of the topic. What was the outcome? Prompt 5: Personal growth. Specific, sensory details make the reader feel as if they're seeing the experience through your eyes, giving them a better sense of who you are.

What were the moments in life that fundamentally changed you as a prompt This advice might sound obvious, but when you're used to writing academic essays, it can be tricky to dive deep into your own perspective.

Some schools will state that if this isn't enough space, you can send them a physical copy of your essay. What Is It Asking? Present a situation or quandary argumentative essay essay method show steps toward the solution. Avoid anything college or general: for example, "How I plan to solve world hunger" is probably not going to work.

Any kind of problem "no matter the scale" is fine—it just has to be important to you. Colleges want to admit students who are intellectually engaged with the world. President in a mock government and diplomacy exercise bring out leadership skills you never knew you had?

Some key questions to consider: How do you deal with hardship? Sample essay for option 2: "Student Teacher" by Max Option 3 Reflect on a essay when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. We have often found that smaller, less formal events make for more surprising and memorable essays; but as with any of the other prompts, as long as you can answer with originality and put a unique twist on your subject matter, all ideas are fair game.

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How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? How did this change the way you interact and connect with others?

2019-20 college essay prompts

Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a prompt. Your answer should not be a book report. Prompt 2: Learning from obstacles. If they college speak to you, don't feel compelled to answer them. Show your feathers.

Buy an essay

We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. You'll have to search for the best topic, just like this bird is searching for food. As such, your topic needs to be something meaningful to you. What does it mean for a topic to be "meaningful to you"? First, it means that you genuinely care about the topic and want to write your college essay on it—no one ever wrote a great essay on a topic that they felt they had to write about. Second, it means that the topic shows off a quality or trait you want to highlight for the admissions committee. For example, say I wanted to write about my summer job with the Parks Department. It's not enough to simply tell a story about my feud with a raccoon that kept destroying all the progress I made repairing a bench; I would need to make it clear what that experience ;shows about my character perseverance and explain what it ;taught me that there are some things in life you simply can't control. Remember that the most important thing is that your essay is about you. This advice might sound obvious, but when you're used to writing academic essays, it can be tricky to dive deep into your own perspective. I recommend starting the writing process two months in advance of your first college application deadline. On a similar note, you should take the essay seriously: it's an important part of your application and worth investing the time in to get right. If you just dash something off thoughtlessly, admissions officers will recognize that and consider it evidence that you aren't really interested in their school. Try to write about a topic you haven't talked about elsewhere, or take a different angle on it. A college essay is not a resume—it's the best opportunity to show off your unique personality to admissions committees. Pick your topic accordingly. The more specific you can get, the more unique your topic will be to you. Lots of people have tried out for a school play, for example, but each had their own particular experience of doing so. One student saw trying out for the role of Hamlet as the culmination of many years of study and hard work and was devastated not to get it, while another was simply proud to have overcome her nerves enough to try out for the chorus line in West Side Story. These would make for very different essays, even though they're on basically the same topic. Another benefit of a specific topic is that it makes coming up with supporting details much easier. Specific, sensory details make the reader feel as if they're seeing the experience through your eyes, giving them a better sense of who you are. Take a look at this example sentence: General: I was nervous as I waited for my turn to audition. Specific: As I waited for my name to be called, I tapped the rhythm of "America" on the hard plastic chair, going through the beats of my audition song over and over in my head. The first version could be written by almost anyone; the second version has a specific perspective—it's also intriguing and makes you want to know more. The more specific your essay topic is, the more clearly your unique voice will come through and the more engaging your essay will be. Breaking Down the Common App Essay Prompts Now that we've established the basic ideas you need to keep in mind as you brainstorm, let's go through the Common App essay questions one at a time and break down what admissions committees are looking for in responses. Keep in mind that for each of these questions, there are really two parts. The first is describing something you did or something that happened to you. The second is explaining what that event, action, or activity means to you. No essay is complete without addressing both sides of the topic. Common App Essay Prompt 1: A Key Piece of Your Story Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. What Is It Asking? This prompt is very broad. Then this prompt could be a good one for you. The key is that whatever you write about needs to be genuinely important to you personally, not just something you think will look good to the admissions committee. You need to clarify why this story is so important that you couldn't leave it off your application. What Do They Want to Know? This question is really about showing admissions officers how your background has shaped you. Can you learn and grow from your experiences? By identifying an experience or trait that is vital to your story, you're also showing what kind of person you see yourself as. Do you value your leadership abilities or your determination to overcome challenges? Your intellectual curiosity or your artistic talent? Everyone has more than one important trait, but in answering this prompt, you're telling admissions officers what you think is your most significant quality. What Kinds of Topics Could Work? You could write about almost anything for this prompt: an unexpected interest, a particularly consuming hobby, a part of your family history, or a life-changing event. Make sure to narrow in on something specific, though. You don't have room to tell your whole life story! Your topic can be serious or silly, as long as it's important to you. Just remember that it needs to showcase a deeper quality of yours. For example, if I were writing an essay on this topic, I would probably write about my life-long obsession with books. I'd start with a story about how my parents worried I read too much as a kid, give some specific examples of things I've learned from particular books, and talk about how my enthusiasm for reading was so extreme it sometimes interfered with my actual life like the time I tripped and fell because I couldn't be bothered to put down my book long enough to walk from my room to the kitchen. Then I would tie it all together by explaining how my love of reading has taught me to look for ideas in unexpected places. What Should You Avoid? You don't want your essay to read like a resume: it shouldn't be a list of accomplishments. Your essay needs to add something to the rest of your application, so it also shouldn't focus on something you've already covered unless you have a really different take on it. In addition, try to avoid generic and broad topics: you don't want your essay to feel as though it could've been written by any student. As I touched on above, one way to avoid this problem is to be very specific—rather than writing generally about your experience as the child of immigrants, you might tell a story about a specific family ritual or meaningful moment. Recount an incident or time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? This prompt is pretty straightforward. It's asking you to describe a challenge or obstacle you faced or a time you failed, and how you dealt with it. The part many students forget is the second half: what lessons did you learn from your challenge or failure? If you take on this question, you must show how you grew from the experience and, ideally, how you incorporated what you learned into other endeavors. This question really raises two issues: how you handle difficult situations and whether you're capable of learning from your mistakes. You'll face a lot of challenges in college, both academic and social. In addressing this prompt, you have the opportunity to show admissions officers that you can deal with hardships without just giving up. You also need to show that you can learn from challenges and mistakes. Can you find a positive lesson in a negative experience? Colleges want to see an example of how you've done so. Good topics will be specific and have a clearly explained impact on your perspective. You need to address both parts of the question: the experience of facing the challenge and what you learned from it. However, almost any kind of obstacle, challenge, or failure—large or small—can work: Doing poorly at a job interview and how that taught you to deal with nerves Failing a class and how retaking it taught you better study skills Directing a school play when the set collapsed and how it taught you to stay cool under pressure and think on your feet What Should You Avoid? Make sure you pick an actual failure or challenge—don't turn your essay into a humblebrag. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking?

This option was entirely new inand it's a wonderfully essay prompt. Just focus on a specific step in the process of growing up and explain what it meant to you and how you've changed. The answer to the final question about the "outcome" of your challenge prompt not be a success story.

In short: when and how have you grown as a person? Choose this prompt if you have a relevant—and specific! How do you think you can positively contribute to a cause that is important to you?

What or who do you turn to when you college to learn more? Simply writing down some of your ideas, no matter how great they are, isn't going to make for a very interesting essay.