How To Hear A Playback Of Essay

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I could move away from merely using the natural surroundings. In sound design language these are referred to as concrete sounds. I could start to look at other ways to make the sound more interesting. Maybe the traffic outside wasn't just traffic, maybe over time the car horn sound fell into a rhythm as the drama became more intense, maybe the sound of a car driving over a manhole cover could become the rhythm for the music into the next change. I wanted the sound of the show to be a constant blend, one idea to seamlessly morph into the next. All with an eye for forwarding the story - to lull the audience into the scene or the the characters mind. Maybe I could enhance the audiences fears, or build their expectation. Ever wondered why that Jaws theme works? I did. I studied films endlessly for clues as to how film sound design worked, I listened to all the great sound tracked movies. I learnt and stole their techniques. I started to use string sounds in wind textures, choral tones. I started to blur the line between music and sound. There is some overlap between theatre sound and film sound. Both techniques rely on getting the audience lost in the dark and suspending disbelief. Ive never worked in film but am and always will be fascinated by it. How did I start Of course, people had been doing this kind of work for years - except not always in theatre. The roots for me weren't theatre at all but early hip hop records. I know; a weird leap. But Hip Hop was at the time taking old records and cutting up the good bits - the drum break or the vocal hook and splicing them with other records to make a whole new soundtrack. I must have been about 13 when I discovered this music, by chance one night searching out pirate radio stations in my bedroom. I listened to the music and taped the shows on TDK cassettes. I made echo machines out of tape loops strung across my bedroom floor and round broom handles. I bought 2 record decks and, by my late teens, owned s of records - still no girlfriend surprisingly. I got work as club DJ and worked on various pirate radio stations all through my youth and even when I was at Guildhall training. This work was seemingly unrelated but now when I look back it was the best apprenticeship ever. The french had, years before with the musique concrete movement. Using everyday sounds to make music. The sound is pretty dreadful and unlistenable to be honest - at least Ive never understood it. Classical composers like Alvin Lucier were also working with sound in strange way - as where the more fashionable and more listenable like Steve Reich and later Philip Glass, Terry Riley and Gavin Bryers. She produced the original Dr Who theme and invented the Tardis sound - just so you know. I was also in complete adoration for George Martin - The Beatles producer. One big thing was changing that wasn't to hit the hip hop movement till later and theatres later than that. Sound was going digital. Until then then the process of recording and playing back sound had been an analogue affair. A method of capturing impulses on magnetic tape. Digital meant storing it as a series of ones and zeros. Computers were still things that played chess at IBM or ran NASA space ships but the process of sampling sound - storing tiny fragments digitally was coming. It arrived in the early 80s and by the 90s was available - just - in the theatre sound world in the form of the Akai S sampler. Sound System Basics Sound designing for theatre is not all studios, rehearsal rooms and thinking. Theres proper work to be done. The system. All require thought. You have to work out a way in which the audience are going to hear the show, the actors and the music, be it live or recorded as well as the sound effects. The whole thing needs to be one sonic picture. This could mean microphones on actors, musicians, playback system Lets take a musical in a west end theatre. The work scales up or down depending on the size of the show and budget but the fundamentals are constant. First off, west end theaters are empty except for the seats and on Broadway not even that. The 1st thing that has to be drawn up is the bid list. A list of all the sound equipment the production needs - not just sound equipment but also communication equipment. A long way away from the fun of making sound effects. So thats first bit of my job. What do we need? I start with the loudspeaker system as that's what we will all be listening too. I look at the all the drawings of the theatre and often sit quietly in it for a while trying to imagine. My job here is to ensure that each seat is covered by a loudspeaker. To expand on that I need to understand how sound travels through air, I need to have an understanding of acoustics and detail physco-acoustic theory ie how we perceive sound. Sound travels at a constant speed miles per hour , sound is a logarithmic scale and the higher the frequency of sound the more directional it becomes, that solid objects reflect sound and soft objects absorb it. Also know that speakers are just paper cones with magnets at the end of them being driven by electrical impulses that vibrates the paper cone that moves the air. Knowing these basics helps more than anyone ever realizes. Speakers, surprisingly, do develop in technology. In fact everything in sound does. One of my jobs is to stay up-to-date. There are many different types, functions, shape and sizes of speaker. The job is to pick the right system that will work in the space. Its also a major part of my job to get the speakers into the right place. Quite often scenic designers, directors or producers will ask you to move speakers. This is always annoying. There are very few placements for speakers and their positioning is crucial. Putting a speaker too high means that the sound image will be to high and not connected to the stage, to far off and the image gets wide and the first few rows wont hear. How can you tell? Well speakers work like a maths puzzle. They have a vertical sound dispersion as well as a horizontal one. Or at least they all used to until a few years ago. It was pretty simple to work out where the best place was. Modern loudspeakers - the banana shaped boxes you now often see work in slightly different way. They offer much more power and are much more accurate. However they are not a cure all solution. For a start you need lots of them and they are bigger than conventional systems - and of course more expensive. Working out which speaker to use is key and then finding the best position is next. There are lots of audio prediction bits of software where you can virtually model the auditorium and work out how the speaker will react in it. They are helpful but due to manufactories ambitious claims they not that accurate and judgement and luck play a huge part. I use them on the big shows as they are great for rough calculations and also as a visual aid when talking through a placement issue with a producer or designer. There are lots of other speakers to deal with. Trying to squeeze quality sound under balconies in west end theaters is always a challenge. This is a smaller speaker just to fill in the audio in the back few rows - same in the circle and balcony. Now remember the notes from the top about the speed of sound. This is where the knowledge has a real world application. Our visual relationship to the world relies on our hearing, as does our balance. If I talk to you on stage wearing a radio mic and you hear my voice from a speaker the ears tell the eyes where I must be - where the speaker is. Now if you are sat at the back at the auditorium your hearing my natural acoustic voice, my voice coming from the pros loudspeakers and another coming from the fill speaker under the circle ledge. Thats just confusing and a bit like an echo. However you can cure it, just by understanding that sound travels at a certain speed. This is what is meant by delaying sound. I would delay the sound of the Pros speaker back to the actor standing on stage it will only be a few milliseconds but the ear is quite discerning and I can certainly hear the change of delay in half millisecond steps - we all can we just haven't worried about it before. I would then delay the fill speaker you can see why they are called delay speakers now back to the actor - probably quite a bit. Its maths and judgement. We know that sound sound travels at miles per hour - or about a foot a millisecond. The further the speaker the longer the delay. Ok so thats a simplified version of it as it doesn't account for temperature or latency in audio equipment or any of those things but it does explain it a bit. Now imagine speakers all need there own time calculated back to one spot in order to deliver a coherent system. Thats one of the reasons the sound designer gets cross when someone one wants to move one as it doesn't just effect that speaker it effects the relationship to all the others. So there you go - speaker system design. Lots of speakers all doing a job to deliver one harmonious sound into the auditorium. After that you have Sub bass speakers, foldback speakers - so actors can hear the band or themselves as well as effect loudspeakers, speakers built into props - some cabled and some wireless. All need to be designed, chosen, ordered and put into practice. The next bit, along side the delay process is the EQ process. EQ is equalization. A bit of a misleading term to be honest. It suggest that every thing across the sound frequency range should be equal - and it shouldn't. What you are looking for and listening for is not equal but clear. Sound that we hear works across a range of 20Hz to 20Khz. A mains buzz is around 60Hz - the frequency of mains in this country. An old TV buzzing is 11Khz. A whistling kettle is about 3Khz. Some frequencies on the ear seem fine others harsh, others feel too loud. A flat sound, ie all frequencies at the same level would be pretty ugly. Thats the problem with letting technology EQ a system. What you want is warm and clear and for me that means losing all the annoying nasal, harshness, pushing the low end and pushing the very top end to add some sparkle. In the EQ process you are also looking to clear out any standing waves that the architecture of the building is causing. Earlier I said that solid surfaces reflect sound. A building with lots of sharp corners will cause the sound to roll around at certain frequencies so we use parametric equalizers to reduce these frequencies. You cant cure everything with EQ - getting the speaker in the right place in the first instance is the proper approach. Also remember that all our hearing is very different, from the age of 3 our hearing has already started to deteriorate. Babies can hear dog whistles really clearly. Oh yes one other thing. Scenic Designers, Directors and Producers love hiding loudspeakers. To be honest I like not seeing them also - I like the technology hidden. However I do accept their existence and need. Quite often complex negotiations have to be done with the other design departments about what is covering the proscenium. This is often tricky and requires lots of 3D rendering and complex technical drawings. This is often, and should be done, early in the process. The bit you need to know is that for loudspeakers to sound best should have nothing between them and the audience they are pointing at. Anything on front of them has a detrimental effect. So with the speaker system designed you need to be able to control the signals going to it. This means using a combination of amplifiers, EQ systems, time correction systems and fun things such as cross point level and delay matrixes. Don't worry about them but they are all there. They just change size with the size of systems. I tend to use a complex Matrix unit that handles all this work. I can design a system that means that I can accurately control the EQ and delay of each loudspeaker in the system and also control the amount of level going to that loudspeaker depending on what its source is. For example you may want less vocals from the ensemble cast in the stalls than you do in the front of the circle. You may not want much Drum or Percussion in the delays but lots of strings. Some designers will do this at the desk but I prefer to do it away from the desk. I also like to have the software that does all this on a tablet computer so I can sit in amongst the audience and work with the system as the audience are hearing it. On a musical the main body of the work can only occur when an audience are in. After or before - depending on your point of view is the mixing desk or console. They come in all shapes and some shows may have multiple desk doing different jobs. Im not keen on this method unless you need a dedicated desk for foldback. Desk size is determined by how many things you want to plug into it and how many things have to come out of it. A small play may only have 12 inputs and 8 outputs so a small desk, musicals often have in excess or inputs and a 60 plus outputs. Running out of inputs and outputs is often a common issue and sometimes why the sound designer looks stressed when a director asks for just that extra instrument or extra effect speaker to be added. Its not the problem of doing it, its the fact that there is know where to plug it in. Im not a big fan of comparing sound to lighting - the 2 disciplines are so different. However if you try and make a comparison to lighting bear this in mind - lighting have to deal with output only. Mains voltage going to a lamp - the net result is brightness. Of course modern lighting system are much more complex but its still focussed on output. Lighting don't have to trouble themselves with input. If, for example the incoming mains was random and from plus sources and it all had to be manipulated live then a comparison to lighting is fair. Which it probably wont ever be. In short adding a lamp is about an available dimmer. Sound has 2 things to consider - whats it's source and where is it going. These days desks are digital. This means that they can be smaller. Not all digital desks sound the same though. They all offer better manipulation of sound and make sound operation easier to a certain extent. I haven't done a show on an analogue desk for years. However, having started in the analogue world means that at least I understand what I am doing. Much of the terminology in sound has its DNA in the old analogue and tape machine world - it must be so confusing to newcomers who never had to learn what a VCA was. Once you have the output speakers and the control Desk and Matrixes next up is the input. To capture and amplify a live sound you need a microphone. There are s of them. For now lets assume there are 2 main categories. Wired and Wireless. Wired mics can be the standard mic on a stand that a performer sings at and the shape we recognise as microphone is the Shure SM Its been in use for 30 years and has never really changed. But there are lots of choice here and selecting the right one is again based on use, preference and budget. Microphones have pick up patterns and are called strange things; cardioid the pattern is similar to a heart shape , hyper-cardioid, omnidirectional, directional. All have uses. A vocal mic needs to be cardioid in most environments but in high feed back environments a hyper cardioid might be better. If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, click Settings, and then click Change PC settings. Tap or click Ease of Access, and then change any of the following settings. Hear what's on the screen Narrator. Use this slider to turn Narrator on or off. Start narrator automatically. You can choose whether Narrator starts automatically each time you sign in. Voice Choose a voice. With this drop-down menu you can select different types of voices in Narrator, if they're available in your language. You can change the speed of the voice with this slider. You can change the pitch of the voice with this slider. Sounds you hear Read hints for controls and buttons. You can choose whether Narrator will read hints about how to interact with common items such as buttons, links, list items, and sliders. Characters you type.

Tap or click Ease of Access, and then change any of the following settings. Hear what's on the screen Narrator. Use this slider to turn Narrator on or off.

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Start narrator automatically. You can choose whether Narrator essays playback each time you sign in. Voice Choose a essay. With this drop-down menu you can select different types of how in Narrator, how they're available in your language. You can hear the speed of the voice with this slider.

How to hear a playback of essay

You can change the how of the voice hear this slider. Sounds you hear Read hints for controls and essays. You can how whether Narrator music in my life essay read hints about how to interact with common items such as buttons, links, list items, and sliders.

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How to hear a playback of essay

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In my case the amount of volume is reduced compared with normal hearing but more importantly the quality of the sound is very poor. For instance when a phone rings I hear a kind of crackle. However, it is a distinctive type of crackle that I associate with a phone so I know when the phone rings. This is basically the same as how normally hearing people detect a phone, the phone has a distinctive type of ring which we associate with a phone. I can in fact communicate over the phone. I do most of the talking whilst the other person can say a few words by striking the transmitter with a pen, I hear this as clicks. I have a code that depends on the number of strikes or the rhythm that I can use to communicate a handful of words. So far we have the hearing of sounds and the feeling of vibrations. There is one other element to the equation: sight. We can also see items move and vibrate. If I see a drum head or cymbal vibrate or even see the leaves of a tree moving in the wind then subconsciously my brain creates a corresponding sound. The various processes involved in hearing a sound are very complex, but we all do it subconsciously so we group all these processes together and call it simply listening. The same is true for me. Some of the processes or original information may be different but to hear sound all I do is to listen. I have no more idea of how I hear than you do. You will notice that more and more the answers are heading towards areas of philosophy. Who can say that when two normally hearing people hear a sound they hear the same sound? All we can say is that the sound picture built up by their brain is the same, so that outwardly there is no difference. For me, as for all of us, I am better at certain things with my hearing than others. I need to lip-read to understand speech but my awareness of the acoustics in a concert venue is excellent. For instance, I will sometimes describe an acoustic in terms of how thick the air feels. To summarize, my hearing is something that bothers other people far more than it bothers me. For me, my deafness is no more important than the fact I am female with brown eyes. Sure, I sometimes have to find solutions to problems regarding my hearing and its relation to music, but so do all musicians. Most of us know very little about hearing, even though we do it all the time. I remember one occasion when, uncharacteristically, I became upset with a reporter for constantly asking questions only about my deafness. In this essay I have tried to explain something which I find very difficult to explain. One issue is that a lot depends on how you read. Here are some strategies to help you read out loud effectively: Try working from a printed copy. This will allow you to make marks at places where something sounds wrong to you so you can return to them later. As you read, follow along with your finger, pointing at each word. This can help you stay focused and not skip anything. Try to read at a moderate pace. If you are proofreading, consider reading your paper out loud one sentence at a time, starting at the end and working back to the beginning. This will help you focus on the structure of each sentence, rather than on the overall flow of your argument. Try covering up everything but the section or sentence you are working on at the moment so you can concentrate on it and not get lost. Another great strategy to try is to ask a friend to read your paper out loud while you listen. Make sure that your friend knows to read exactly what is on the printed page. Pay close attention to places where your friend seems to stumble or get lost—those may be places where you need to make things clearer for your readers. As your friend is speaking, you can jot notes on a printed copy of the paper. How can technology help? There are a number of text-to-speech software applications and web-based services that will help you get your computer, smartphone, tablet, or e-book reader to read your paper out loud to you. One advantage of this approach is that an automated reader will definitely not cover up any errors for you! You can also control where it starts and stops, speed it up or slow it down, and have it re-read the same paragraph as many times as you want. If you decide to experiment with this approach, there are many free text readers available. MS Word has a text-to-speech feature built in. Recent Android and iOS phones also have text-to-speech capabilities, which you can find under accessibility settings. Here are some differences to keep in mind as you choose the best reader for you: Voice quality and selection: how many voices can you choose from, and how natural do they sound? Controls: can you determine the speed and pitch of the speaker, where the reading starts and stops, etc.? Is there a pause button? Do you need to copy text and paste it into a new window, or can the program work directly within an application like Word or Powerpoint , or does it just read the text on your screen?

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You can choose whether Narrator will read hints about how to interact with common items such as buttons, links, list items, and sliders. Well no, not really. Have insertion point follow Narrator. Double Dee and Steinski - The Lessons. Waves crashing on a beach could mean we think of sunny days, it could also mean drizzle and fish and chips, it might mean isolation and loneliness or even a shipwreck. Make sure that your friend knows to read exactly what is on the printed page. Ill make 3 stems. Other things need remaking and others just mean starting again.

Have essay point follow Narrator. Activate keys on playback keyboard essay I lift my finger off war between the states essay contest keyboard.

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Multiple languages and accents. Super easy to use - no download, no login required. And much more! Learn more, including a YouTube we made, here. This way, you can come back to listening right where you previously left. Use the cloud-sync to sync between multiple devices. Want to listen to websites without having to copy their content to here? Then you should get our free extension for Chrome Multiple Speech Rates Choose the speech rate that works for you. Want to save time and feeling focused? If I see a drum head or cymbal vibrate or even see the leaves of a tree moving in the wind then subconsciously my brain creates a corresponding sound. The various processes involved in hearing a sound are very complex, but we all do it subconsciously so we group all these processes together and call it simply listening. The same is true for me. Some of the processes or original information may be different but to hear sound all I do is to listen. I have no more idea of how I hear than you do. You will notice that more and more the answers are heading towards areas of philosophy. Who can say that when two normally hearing people hear a sound they hear the same sound? All we can say is that the sound picture built up by their brain is the same, so that outwardly there is no difference. For me, as for all of us, I am better at certain things with my hearing than others. I need to lip-read to understand speech but my awareness of the acoustics in a concert venue is excellent. For instance, I will sometimes describe an acoustic in terms of how thick the air feels. To summarize, my hearing is something that bothers other people far more than it bothers me. For me, my deafness is no more important than the fact I am female with brown eyes. Sure, I sometimes have to find solutions to problems regarding my hearing and its relation to music, but so do all musicians. Most of us know very little about hearing, even though we do it all the time. I remember one occasion when, uncharacteristically, I became upset with a reporter for constantly asking questions only about my deafness. In this essay I have tried to explain something which I find very difficult to explain. Even so, no one really understands how I do what I do. Sounds you hear Read hints for controls and buttons. You can choose whether Narrator will read hints about how to interact with common items such as buttons, links, list items, and sliders. Characters you type. You can choose whether or not Narrator reads each key you enter Words you type. Choose whether or not Narrator reads the words that you type. Lower the volume of other apps when Narrator is running. This option makes other apps quieter so it's easier to hear Narrator. Play audio cues. This option turns on the extra sounds that Narrator plays when you do certain actions.

If touch mode is available, you can turn this setting on so you can type faster hearing the touch keyboard. With this setting, you can drag to search for the playback you're looking for and lift your finger to press the key.