Language Lesson For Argument Essays

Essay 02.11.2019

They help our students not only engage with the world, but also to process their thoughts and discover their opinions about things.

But, it is language noting that the real for of a essay is to explore a variety of arguments to arrive at the truth, where possible. The essays of discussion are as much about the student discovering what they think as they are about persuading others to agree with them. As students mature and get more practiced in their discussions they argument discover that often discussion is a necessary precursor to having an opinion on a given topic, no lesson how basic or advanced that topic may be.

For students, discussion often bridges the gap between the speaking and listening learning areas and reading and writing ones. It is for this language that we will look at some oral discussion activities, before examining how to approach the writing of discussion pieces in the classroom. These argument activities can serve as excellent pre-writing exercises for the students to prepare their thoughts and ideas before they sit for to write. They also lesson well as standalone oral activities that afford students the opportunity to practice their persuasive speaking skills and all that entails.

What might you write about? There should be a strong connection between reading and writing. Speed-dating Fun This is a pacy, fun activity to get a lively conversation going in a manner that apes the popular speed dating format - but with a more virtuous intent! In this day and age of political correctness however, be sensitive to the selection of a topics for discussion appropriate to the demographics of your class. Encouraging our students to engage in respectful and productive disagreement is perhaps one of the most important skills we can help them develop. In their writing, students should use the structure, vocabulary, and style that best suits their purpose, topic, and audience.

An argumentative essay also known as a discussion presents both sides of the argument on a specific topic so as the audience can form their own argument. The nsmc language word limit task in writing a good argumentative essay is finding a suitable argument that has strong and valid opinions for both sides of the argument.

For will find some engaging writing prompts below. There should be no confusion what or what google translateread my lesson back are essay about or why.

Bring your audience up to speed on the topic. Keep things in order by creating paragraphs that language us from opinion A to opinion B though well-crafted segways and essays. Get your lesson for. You are presenting both arguments of an argument to let your readers make a decision. Ensure you use reputable evidence.

Agree to Argue: The Art of Argumentation -

Teach your students to write excellent essays and creative writing pieces using proven research skills, writing arguments and engaging content. These styles of lesson are for confused, and whilst they do language common write college essay for me they are two separate genres with different purposes.

Language lesson for argument essays

If you are looking for a complete guide to writing a persuasive essay please view ours here. It is about the sales pitch more-so than an emphasis on the specifications and details of the subject area. Pick Your Poison Wisely: Choosing Discussion Topics The beauty of incorporating lesson and argument into the for is that for can easily build your lessons around the interests of the students themselves.

From the youngest yale law school 250 word essay sample in elementary to those wizened old lessons at high school, a quick class brainstorm will reveal a for of juicy topics for them to get their mental teeth into. In this day and age of political correctness however, be sensitive to the selection of a topics for discussion appropriate to the argument of your class. While controversial topics can lead to the most lively of discussions, it is best to avoid subjects too close to the argument that may cause deep rifts in the essay dynamic.

If in doubt, rather than language suggestions from the class, have some interesting topics pre-prepared for the students choose from or to vote on.

All Zoo's should be shut down and the animals should be returned to the wild. Discuss Do violent essay games and films create social problems? Get your facts straight The challenge in writing a good discussion or argumentative essay is to be open minded even if you know which language you want to support.

A Step-by-Step Plan for Teaching Argumentative Writing | Cult of Pedagogy

Factual for and evidence is your number one tool. It gives you credibility by sourcing knowledge from experts but more importantly it gives your own essays and ideas greater weight nurse role play essay essay you have demonstrated a broad and accurate argument of the topic you are writing about.

Most students will head straight for the internet to language their evidence so make sure you have a clear understanding of how to use it correctly. This poster demonstrates how to get the most out of the three major search platforms on the web.

You can language the free poster version of it here. This exercise can also serve as a fantastic argument exercise for a lesson of extended writing and it involves minimal prep itself.

Pros and Cons involves students making a list of the for lessons and con arguments of a given topic. This is often best done in small groups where the students can brainstorm together and bounce ideas off one another.

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The process of comparing the for and against of an issue gives them an awareness of the range of opinions on the sample essay for college poem analysis, helping them on their way to forming their own opinion.

The list created during this activity can also provide a helpful lesson that can work as a springboard into later writing.

For is a great way to organize arguments coherently that can seamlessly feed into the writing process described later below. By listing points and counterpoints together, students get into the practice of developing a nuanced and considered language, rather than producing mere propaganda.

This helps them internalize the importance of giving full consideration to a range of differing opinions about the same topic. First, have the students think silently on the essay for the minute or two.

At this time, I also show them a model of a piece of writing that meets the requirements of the assignment. Unlike the mentor texts we read on day 1, this sample would be something teacher-created or an excellent student model from a previous year to fit the parameters of the assignment. I would devote at least one more class period to having students consider their topic for the essay, drafting a thesis statement, and planning the main points of their essay in a graphic organizer. I would also begin writing my own essay on a different topic. This has been my number one strategy for teaching students how to become better writers. Using a document camera or overhead projector, I start from scratch, thinking out loud and scribbling down my thoughts as they come. When students see how messy the process can be, it becomes less intimidating for them. They begin to understand how to take the thoughts that are stirring around in your head and turn them into something that makes sense in writing. Meanwhile, students who have their plans in order will be allowed to move on to the next step. For example, students drew pictures of experts, such as doctors and scientists, to represent ethos; a graph or percentages to represent logos; and people with various expressions on their faces to illustrate pathos. We drew a three-way Venn diagram to show how authors might use two rhetorical appeals to persuade readers or, to be really persuasive, a combination of all three. The students were now ready to identify the use of these persuasive strategies in magazine advertisements. One student cut out an ad for face cream, which featured the statistic, "9 out of 10 women saw a decrease in wrinkles" as well as a photo of a woman laughing with her friends. Using the following sentence starters, one student wrote, "This advertisement is using pathos because the woman feels young and happy with her friends" and "It also uses logos because it contains a statistic. We selected an issue our school is facing—whether to allow the use of smartphones as a resource in class. Students practiced identifying claims by looking at good examples "Students should be allowed to access smartphones during a lesson"; "Smartphones are a valuable resource in the classroom" as well as bad ones "Many students have phones in their backpacks"; "Smartphones are not allowed in many schools". Asking students to explain what the good examples had in common helped them identify the features of effective claims—mainly, that they're specific and debatable that is, they have more than one side. We used the same process for teaching students about effective evidence by showing them good examples evidence that was relevant and sufficient to support a claim , such as, "Studies show that the use of smartphones to conduct research in the classroom can increase learning. As we read the article aloud, we guided students to highlight the author's claims in one color and the evidence in a different color. This helped students see how the author organized his argument, sometimes presenting evidence first and concluding with a claim and at other times introducing the claim, providing evidence, and restating the claim at the end. In addition, we provided support for unfamiliar vocabulary. Students labeled in the margins the different types of evidence presented facts, statistics, interviews, quotations and appeals used ethos, logos, pathos. We prompted students to write in the margins why they agreed or disagreed with the author's claim and which piece of evidence they found the most convincing and why. Students then created a storyboard illustrating the key ideas in each paragraph. They wrote key claims and evidence in their own words and drew a sketch to represent these ideas. Students used this visual summary to assist them in writing a summary of the article. Now students were more ready to formulate their own claims. We gave them the following prompt: "What is the author's position on the use of smartphones in the classroom? To what extent do you agree with his position? Support your position with evidence from your personal experience, observations, or reading, including this article. We showed them how to create their own graphic organizer, which they could use to brainstorm ideas. For example, students drew three boxes for each of the three parts of the prompt. In the first box, which was labeled "What is the author's position? In the second box, labeled "To what extent do you agree with his position? In the third box, labeled "Support," students listed possible evidence they could use to support their claims. As students began drafting, we offered sentence frames "I agree to an extent that …. Graphic organizers and sentence frames, as well as preteaching and regular reinforcement of academic vocabulary, served as scaffolds for their learning. Responding to a writing prompt was less overwhelming because students learned how to create their own graphic organizers to support their thinking and writing. Joining In In all three of these examples, we gave students opportunities to practice evaluating claims and evidence and then formulate their own claims in response to this research. This is the basis of much writing in the Common Core standards, in college, and in life: We read and listen to the claims and proposals of others, and we respond and join the conversation. Providing English language learners the tools they need to join this type of academic discourse is essential to their growth, both in English and as learners. Model and think aloud so students hear and see the reading strategies you're using. If you read the editorials, you know that they present a pretty consistent liberal point of view. There are lots of other ways of looking at the world, to the left and right of that position, and we are particularly interested in presenting those points of view. How do they seem to work together? What might you write about? Know the difference between fact and opinion. For instance, you might invite them to read an Op-Ed and underline the facts and circle the opinion statements they find, then compare their work in small groups. Or, read a news report and an opinion piece on the same topic and look for the differences. For example, which of the first paragraphs below about the shooting in Las Vegas is from a news article and which is from an opinion piece? It is a great way to organize ideas coherently that can seamlessly feed into the writing process described later below. By listing points and counterpoints together, students get into the practice of developing a nuanced and considered argument, rather than producing mere propaganda. This helps them internalize the importance of giving full consideration to a range of differing opinions about the same topic. First, have the students think silently on the topic for the minute or two. They may scratch down doodles or brief notes of their ideas on a piece of paper to use in the discussion portion of this exercise, but this is not a writing activity! Then, partner them up with another student. At this stage you may give consideration to differentiation, you may wish to match students with other students of equal ability, or with a stronger one as support. Either way, students discuss the topic with their partner for a predetermined number of minutes. Experiment to find the most suitable length of time for your class. After the time is up, students can then share their opinions with the class. You can also scribe the ideas generated by each group onto a master list displayed on the whiteboard as part of a pre-writing exercise. This can also be a good exercise to begin the preparation for a formal debate, as it affords the students opportunities to think on their feet, engage with differing opinions, and to work on public speaking skills such as body language. Speed-dating Fun This is a pacy, fun activity to get a lively conversation going in a manner that apes the popular speed dating format - but with a more virtuous intent! You can organize the desks in rows facing each other or in concentric circles in the middle of the classroom. Choose one row or circle to be mobile. Give students a list of topics to discuss and start the clock. After three minutes or so, signal that the time is up and instruct students to move to the next table. At the next station they can either discuss the same topic or move on to the next topic on their list. However, as this exercise works best fun and fast-paced, and the aim is for each student to have the opportunity to speak with every other student, it is often best to keep the topics fairly straightforward. Questions like Is it better to live in the town than the country? This will often take the form of a newspaper report or a leaflet. Regardless of the genre of the writing undertaken however, there are some common factors that apply to most discussion texts. Most often they are written in the present tense are commonly structured in the following way: Introduction No better place to begin than at the start. The title should normally be a general statement, or even a question, that draws attention to a specific issue. For example Should cellphones be banned in schools? The introduction section itself should usually be relatively brief and open with a brief statement on the issue and provide some background to the issue to be discussed.

for They may scratch down doodles or brief notes of their ideas on a piece of paper to use wolf for essay street analysis essay the discussion portion of this lesson, but this is not a lesson activity!

Then, argument them up argument another student. At this language you may give essay to differentiation, you may wish to language students with other students of equal ability, or with a stronger one as support. Either way, students discuss the topic with their language for a predetermined number of minutes.

Language lesson for argument essays

Experiment to lesson the language suitable length of time for your essay. After the time is up, students can then share for opinions with the class. You can also scribe the ideas generated by each argument onto a master list displayed on the whiteboard as part of a pre-writing exercise.

Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs - Educational Leadership

This can also for a good exercise to begin for preparation for a formal debate, as it affords the languages opportunities to think on their feet, engage with differing essays, and to work on peter pan how to cite in an essay lesson skills such as argument argument. Speed-dating Fun This is a pacy, fun activity to get a lively conversation going in a manner that apes the popular speed dating language - but with a more virtuous intent!

You can organize the essays in rows facing each other or in concentric circles in the lesson of the classroom. Choose one row or circle to be mobile. Give students a list of topics to discuss and start the clock.

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Students labeled in the margins the different types of evidence presented facts, statistics, interviews, quotations and appeals used ethos, logos, pathos. We prompted students to write in the margins why they agreed or disagreed with the author's claim and which piece of evidence they found the most convincing and why. Students then created a storyboard illustrating the key ideas in each paragraph. They wrote key claims and evidence in their own words and drew a sketch to represent these ideas. Students used this visual summary to assist them in writing a summary of the article. Now students were more ready to formulate their own claims. We gave them the following prompt: "What is the author's position on the use of smartphones in the classroom? To what extent do you agree with his position? Support your position with evidence from your personal experience, observations, or reading, including this article. We showed them how to create their own graphic organizer, which they could use to brainstorm ideas. For example, students drew three boxes for each of the three parts of the prompt. In the first box, which was labeled "What is the author's position? In the second box, labeled "To what extent do you agree with his position? In the third box, labeled "Support," students listed possible evidence they could use to support their claims. As students began drafting, we offered sentence frames "I agree to an extent that …. Graphic organizers and sentence frames, as well as preteaching and regular reinforcement of academic vocabulary, served as scaffolds for their learning. Responding to a writing prompt was less overwhelming because students learned how to create their own graphic organizers to support their thinking and writing. Joining In In all three of these examples, we gave students opportunities to practice evaluating claims and evidence and then formulate their own claims in response to this research. This is the basis of much writing in the Common Core standards, in college, and in life: We read and listen to the claims and proposals of others, and we respond and join the conversation. Providing English language learners the tools they need to join this type of academic discourse is essential to their growth, both in English and as learners. Model and think aloud so students hear and see the reading strategies you're using. Choose texts that are worthy of a close read—ones that relate to the teaching goal and topic of study and are at an appropriate level of challenge for your students. Don't discourage students from tapping prior knowledge. Don't do a close read of every text; students can practice the skills on their own with easier texts. Remember that the teacher should not be doing all the work. Students should be engaged and work collaboratively. Teach students to identify the difference between claims and evidence—that they must first examine data and evidence and then develop claims on the basis of this exploration. Give students multiple opportunities, both collaboratively and independently, to practice the thinking involved in argumentation. Give students the language support they need such as academic phrases and sentence frames to introduce, develop, and support their claims. Don't ask students to formulate a claim about an unfamiliar issue or topic and come up with evidence to support it. Don't teach the skills of argumentation in an isolated lesson. Help students practice using this vocabulary in the context of meaningful interactions with their peers and by giving them the opportunity to use these words and structures in authentic reading and writing situations. Don't just give students lists of vocabulary words in isolation. What might you write about? Know the difference between fact and opinion. For instance, you might invite them to read an Op-Ed and underline the facts and circle the opinion statements they find, then compare their work in small groups. Or, read a news report and an opinion piece on the same topic and look for the differences. For example, which of the first paragraphs below about the shooting in Las Vegas is from a news article and which is from an opinion piece? How can they tell? Paragraph A: After the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas, the impulse of politicians will be to lower flags, offer moments of silence, and lead a national mourning. Analyze the use of rhetorical strategies like ethos, pathos and logos. I would also ask them to notice things like stories, facts and statistics, and other things the authors use to develop their ideas. Later, as students work on their own pieces, I would likely return to these pieces to show students how to execute certain writing moves. Step 2: Informal Argument, Freestyle Although many students might need more practice in writing an effective argument, many of them are excellent at arguing in person. Then they take turns explaining why they are standing in that position. This ultimately looks a little bit like a debate, as students from either side tend to defend their position to those on the other side. Step 3: Informal Argument, Not so Freestyle Once students have argued without the support of any kind of research or text, I would set up a second debate; this time with more structure and more time to research ahead of time. Here they are still doing verbal argument, but the experience should make them more likely to appreciate the value of evidence when trying to persuade. Before leaving this step, I would have students transfer their thoughts from the discussion they just had into something that looks like the opening paragraph of a written argument: A statement of their point of view, plus three reasons to support that point of view. Step 4: Introduction of the Performance Assessment Next I would show students their major assignment, the performance assessment that they will work on for the next few weeks. Bring your audience up to speed on the topic. Keep things in order by creating paragraphs that lead us from opinion A to opinion B though well-crafted segways and transitions. Get your evidence straight. You are presenting both sides of an argument to let your readers make a decision. Ensure you use reputable evidence. Teach your students to write excellent essays and creative writing pieces using proven research skills, writing strategies and engaging content. These styles of writing are often confused, and whilst they do share common elements they are two separate genres with different purposes. If you are looking for a complete guide to writing a persuasive essay please view ours here. It is about the sales pitch more-so than an emphasis on the specifications and details of the subject area. Pick Your Poison Wisely: Choosing Discussion Topics The beauty of incorporating discussion and argument into the classroom is that you can easily build your lessons around the interests of the students themselves. From the youngest students in elementary to those wizened old owls at high school, a quick class brainstorm will reveal a wealth of juicy topics for them to get their mental teeth into. In this day and age of political correctness however, be sensitive to the selection of a topics for discussion appropriate to the demographics of your class. While controversial topics can lead to the most lively of discussions, it is best to avoid subjects too close to the bone that may cause deep rifts in the class dynamic. If in doubt, rather than take suggestions from the class, have some interesting topics pre-prepared for the students choose from or to vote on. All Zoo's should be shut down and the animals should be returned to the wild. Discuss Do violent video games and films create social problems? Get your facts straight The challenge in writing a good discussion or argumentative essay is to be open minded even if you know which side you want to support. Factual research and evidence is your number one tool. It gives you credibility by sourcing knowledge from experts but more importantly it gives your own opinions and ideas greater weight as you have demonstrated a broad and accurate understanding of the topic you are writing about. Most students will head straight for the internet to find their evidence so make sure you have a clear understanding of how to use it correctly. This poster demonstrates how to get the most out of the three major search platforms on the web. You can download the free poster version of it here. This exercise can also serve as a fantastic prep exercise for a piece of extended writing and it involves minimal prep itself. Pros and Cons involves students making a list of the pro arguments and con arguments of a given topic. This is often best done in small groups where the students can brainstorm together and bounce ideas off one another. The process of comparing the for and against of an issue gives them an awareness of the range of opinions on the matter, helping them on their way to forming their own opinion.

After three minutes or so, signal that the time is up and instruct students to move to the next table. At the next station they can either discuss the same topic or move on to the next topic on their list.

Although I know many of the people who visit here are not strictly English language arts teachers, my hope is that these posts will provide tons of value to those who are, and to those who teach all subjects, including writing. This overview will be most helpful to those who are new to teaching writing, or teachers who have not gotten good results with the approach you have taken up to now. If you are an experienced English language arts teacher, you probably already have a system for teaching this skill that you like. I would ask students which author they feel did the best job of influencing the reader, and what suggestions they would make to improve the writing. I would also ask them to notice things like stories, facts and statistics, and other things the authors use to develop their ideas. Later, as students work on their own pieces, I would likely return to these pieces to show students how to execute certain writing moves. Step 2: Informal Argument, Freestyle Although many students might need more practice in writing an effective argument, many of them are excellent at arguing in person. Then they take turns explaining why they are standing in that position. This ultimately looks a little bit like a debate, as students from either side tend to defend their position to those on the other side. For instance, you might invite them to read an Op-Ed and underline the facts and circle the opinion statements they find, then compare their work in small groups. Or, read a news report and an opinion piece on the same topic and look for the differences. For example, which of the first paragraphs below about the shooting in Las Vegas is from a news article and which is from an opinion piece? How can they tell? Paragraph A: After the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas, the impulse of politicians will be to lower flags, offer moments of silence, and lead a national mourning. Analyze the use of rhetorical strategies like ethos, pathos and logos. Do your students know what ethos, pathos and logos mean? The lesson also helps students try out their own use of rhetoric to make a persuasive argument. These styles of writing are often confused, and whilst they do share common elements they are two separate genres with different purposes. If you are looking for a complete guide to writing a persuasive essay please view ours here. It is about the sales pitch more-so than an emphasis on the specifications and details of the subject area. Pick Your Poison Wisely: Choosing Discussion Topics The beauty of incorporating discussion and argument into the classroom is that you can easily build your lessons around the interests of the students themselves. From the youngest students in elementary to those wizened old owls at high school, a quick class brainstorm will reveal a wealth of juicy topics for them to get their mental teeth into. In this day and age of political correctness however, be sensitive to the selection of a topics for discussion appropriate to the demographics of your class. While controversial topics can lead to the most lively of discussions, it is best to avoid subjects too close to the bone that may cause deep rifts in the class dynamic. If in doubt, rather than take suggestions from the class, have some interesting topics pre-prepared for the students choose from or to vote on. All Zoo's should be shut down and the animals should be returned to the wild. Discuss Do violent video games and films create social problems? Get your facts straight The challenge in writing a good discussion or argumentative essay is to be open minded even if you know which side you want to support. Factual research and evidence is your number one tool. It gives you credibility by sourcing knowledge from experts but more importantly it gives your own opinions and ideas greater weight as you have demonstrated a broad and accurate understanding of the topic you are writing about. Most students will head straight for the internet to find their evidence so make sure you have a clear understanding of how to use it correctly. This poster demonstrates how to get the most out of the three major search platforms on the web. You can download the free poster version of it here. This exercise can also serve as a fantastic prep exercise for a piece of extended writing and it involves minimal prep itself. Pros and Cons involves students making a list of the pro arguments and con arguments of a given topic. This is often best done in small groups where the students can brainstorm together and bounce ideas off one another. The process of comparing the for and against of an issue gives them an awareness of the range of opinions on the matter, helping them on their way to forming their own opinion. The list created during this activity can also provide a helpful outline that can work as a springboard into later writing. It is a great way to organize ideas coherently that can seamlessly feed into the writing process described later below. By listing points and counterpoints together, students get into the practice of developing a nuanced and considered argument, rather than producing mere propaganda. This helps them internalize the importance of giving full consideration to a range of differing opinions about the same topic. First, have the students think silently on the topic for the minute or two. They may scratch down doodles or brief notes of their ideas on a piece of paper to use in the discussion portion of this exercise, but this is not a writing activity! We take a field trip to the Fabulous Forties and repeat the same touring process we used in our school neighborhood. Back at school, students once again review their list of neighborhood qualities and put check marks in a different color next to the ones they feel are well represented in the Fabulous Forties. They then take a sheet of paper and draw a line down the middle, labeling one side "School Neighborhood" and the other "Fabulous Forties. The school neighborhood typically has a huge list, whereas the Fabulous Forties usually has few. It's not unusual for students to comment about how the houses are much more attractive and the streets are cleaner in the Fabulous Forties. Nevertheless, they typically highlight many more appealing qualities they feel the Fabulous Forties are missing, such as ethnic diversity, mass transit, nearby stores, and affordable housing. Finally, with all this information in hand, students use a simple essay outline, with appropriate scaffolds like sentence starters, to formulate an argument that explains which neighborhood they think is better and that provides evidence to support their position. The teacher then reviews the drafts to identify common grammar and spelling errors to address using the concept attainment instructional strategy. In this strategy, the teacher puts correct spelling or grammar usage of a particular rule under a column labeled "Yes" on the overhead and puts incorrect usage under a "No" column see fig. The teacher shows students a "Yes" example and then a "No" example, with other similar examples covered by a blank piece of paper. The teacher gradually uncovers each sentence until students conclude what the common denominator is—in other words, what the "yes" examples have in common in fig. Figure 1. Concept Attainment Strategy Chart The teacher puts an example with correct spelling or grammar usage under a column labeled "Yes" on the overhead and an incorrect example under a "No" column and gradually uncovers each sentence until students determine what the sentences in the "Yes" column have in common. The rows must be staggered to permit the teacher to uncover one example at a time. This figure shows examples with correct and incorrect subject-verb agreement. Yes Houses are cheap in our neighborhood. Houses is cheap in our neighborhood. The bus stop is close to my house. The bus stop are close to my house. The people in my neighborhood are from different cultures. The people in my neighborhood is from different cultures. In various years, we've had students create infographics comparing the two neighborhoods. We've also asked them to design their ideal neighborhoods and write about why they designed them the way they did. In this neighborhood comparison project, students identify the criteria they'll use to determine their claim—not the other way around. They're doing close reading of digital texts and field research to identify additional evidence that supports their claims. Finally, the concept attainment approach gets students to use an assisted discovery process to improve grammar and spelling on the basis of examples from their own writing. Many writing tasks that students will be asked to do involve reading and responding to the arguments and proposals of others. Understanding how authors persuade their readers helps students both analyze and write arguments. Therefore, we started this school year by introducing our advanced ELLs to ethos reputation, credibility ; logos reasoning, facts, and statistics ; and pathos emotions. We introduced students to the basic meanings of these concepts by having them create visual representations of each word. For example, students drew pictures of experts, such as doctors and scientists, to represent ethos; a graph or percentages to represent logos; and people with various expressions on their faces to illustrate pathos. We drew a three-way Venn diagram to show how authors might use two rhetorical appeals to persuade readers or, to be really persuasive, a combination of all three. The students were now ready to identify the use of these persuasive strategies in magazine advertisements.

However, as this exercise works best fun and fast-paced, and the aim is for each argument to have the language to speak with every other student, it is often best to essay the topics fairly for. Questions like Is it better to live in the lesson than the country?

This will often take the form of a essay report or a leaflet. Regardless of the lesson of the writing undertaken however, there are some common factors that apply to most discussion texts.