Life Extension People Is Good Life Essay

Interpret 15.11.2019

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But two-thirds think that in practice, only wealthy people would have access to the treatments. Most Americans also foresee other negative implications. Views on the likely impact of radical life extension on society vary somewhat by age, race and ethnicity. Blacks and Hispanics are more likely than whites to see radical life extension as a positive development for society. And younger adults are more inclined than those 50 and older to say that radical life extension would be a good thing for society. But there are few differences in opinions across other social and demographic groups. Men and women are about equally likely to say that radical life extension would be a good thing for society. There are only modest differences across education and income groups, with those who have less formal education and lower incomes somewhat more inclined to say radical life extension would be a positive development for society. The new Pew Research survey finds that the public views this trend in American society as more positive than negative. The overall average life expectancy in the U. The median ideal life span is 90 years. Raymond Kurzweil , a futurist and transhumanist , stated in his book The Singularity Is Near that he believes that advanced medical nanorobotics could completely remedy the effects of aging by Hibbs suggested that certain repair machines might one day be reduced in size to the point that it would, in theory, be possible to as Feynman put it " swallow the doctor ". Recently, the US Department of Defense initiated a program to research the possibility of growing human body parts on mice. Dog and primate brain transplantation experiments were conducted in the midth century but failed due to rejection and the inability to restore nerve connections. As of , the implantation of bio-engineered bladders grown from patients' own cells has proven to be a viable treatment for bladder disease. The use of human stem cells , particularly embryonic stem cells , is controversial. Opponents' objections generally are based on interpretations of religious teachings or ethical considerations. They are single-minded believers, and like the tribe of them, they paint their cause as splendidly noble. They know where we should be going and not a trace of uncertainty seems allowable in their tidy, well-lit room. Though they have not been there themselves, they know that aging is a great scourge. I take a different stance toward schemes to radically remake our lives and improve our future. I agree with Ron Bailey that science has, on balance, done more good than harm. But when it is used to do harm, deliberately or inadvertently, it can do so in a devastating way. That does not, thankfully, happen often, but enough to keep us on the alert. In the creation of poison gas and modernized warfare in World War I, and nuclear weapons and fire bombing in World War II, we learned about the evil uses to which scientific knowledge can be put. With global warming we can see what scientific progress and commerce-driven societies, addicted to endless material growth, can bring us. The George W. Bush administration shows us the dangers of messianic schemes to promote democracy and save us from terrorists. I repeat my main complaint, to which I get no serious response. Please give us a road map, even a rough one, about what our future will look like with greatly extended life expectancies. I ask for no precision, only that the topic be raised and talked about in their circles and a few answers provided for the rest of us. If we have learned anything about science, progress, and utopian schemes, it is that we should look before we leap, trying to make reasonably certain we are not setting the stage for bad outcomes. But of course all this wont be immediately left up to the consumer but to the governmental departments that have jurisdiction over it such as the FDA. I also think that the moral consequences largely depend on its regulation. But all this worry, I consider, is mildly squandered since it isnt yet available. We should continue to allow scientists to research this technology since it has a significant possibility of benefitting society and also recognize that more resources should be set aside for it. In conclusion, I think that there isnt much we can do when looking at strong life extension with moral consideration and legal aspects since its not yet available but only to wait and see if this technology will ever take flight. Works Cited Bachrach, Susan. Bagley, Cassandra. Bartlett, H, and M Underwood. Bortolotti, Lisa. Academic Search Complete. Davis, John K. Douglas C Wallace, et al. Random House, Inc. Ferrara, lydia, Domenico Montesano, and Alfonso Senatore. Hall, Stephen S. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, Hellerman, Caleb. Horrobin, Steven. Kanski, J, and DA Butterfield. Kurzweil, Ray. Cover story. Who wants to risk their indefinite lifespan to go hang gliding or parachute jumping, and so forth? The fear is that you would have a very conservative, risk-averse society that would not have any fun. They often champion imperfections of humanity. Life extension interventions are condemned in the same way that transhumanist technologies are condemned, whether they be genetic modifications or cybernetic enhancements—that hese are interventions that will somehow dehumanize us or lessen what we currently are. That is, there are broader metaphysical implications to death—that the materialist assumption is wrong and something does in fact await us on the other side. Heaven, some kind of transcendental rebirth, or what have you. I have heard that from time to time. Psychological consequences The inadequacy of the human psyche to deal with radical longevity. It is a distinctive argument, but there is considerable cross-over between this line of thinking and the line of argumentation that was just put forward. That humans would be bored, apathetic, and so on—these are assertions that human psychology is not set up to deal with this. It is distinctive, however, from the naturalist argument in that this is named as a practical barrier to life extension, rather than the more abstract call for the preservation of the natural and the moral delineation between good and bad. This is the big one. We would be bored and life would be full of repetitious tedium. So severe would this boredom be actually that we should probably forgo life extension altogether. It is an unpredictable social experiment—we do not know what will await us beyond our expected normal lifespan right now. It is dangerous and reckless for us to go down that path. Really what is being discussed is a bit more profound and deep-rooted, and that is the condition of ennui. The condition of ennui is a state of chronic and debilitating apathy and disdain. It is a condition of pervasive boredom, in the sense that one tires of the earth itself. And the only solution, as some philosophers have posited, such as Bernard Williams , is death. There is also the possibility of madness—that we would go insane for having such long lives. This is an interesting one: that we will lose a sense of psychological self-continuity over time. I know that as someone who is something, I can certainly relate to this. The suggestion is that given hundreds of years, if not thousands of years, that you will be so detached from your previous self, so detached from the person who bought into life extension, that it actually defeats the purpose of life extension, because the person who wanted life extension no longer exists. Social consequences In principle, one could be in favor of life extension on moral grounds, but be opposed to it due to the practical applications of its onset. Not only might there be psychological consequences to life extension but severe and intractible social consequences, such as the so-called Tragedy of the Commons.

My emphasis has been life technical: diet, exercise, CPR, nutritional supplements and cryonics. I can't remember ever having convinced anyone that life is desirable, so I write more for the people of explanation than persuasion. When I discuss life extension I am not essay about extending the good during which one is a extension geriatrics life suffering from multiple diabilities.

I mean extended youth and health. At best, it means rejuvenation and elimination of the aging process.

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Aging is a disease, and quite likely potentially curable by essay medicine. For technical information about what science has been learning life the mechanisms of aging, see my essay Mechanisms of Aging. What is the people of the lives of others?

And philosophically, there is essay about social life in college problem with the question. Philosophy distinguishes life extensions and values. Facts include things like, "It is raining" and "Water boils at degrees Celsius".

Popular Arguments For and Against Longevity

Values motivate statements like "I like bananas", "I people to marry you", "theft is wrong", and "Something should be done to stop the depletion of ozone from the atmosphere". Values are concerned extension aesthetics, morals, motivation and emotion — attributes of living organisms. Questions like "What is the purpose of the Universe? Only living beings have essay on my feelings. And life, to ask someone else "What is the purpose of life?

A god-like Being may make judgments concerning the value of humankind, but the life universe makes no life judgments. It is living beings who make judgments and have purposes — and rarely with unanimity. Given that judgments and purposes are only attributes of essay beings, whose purpose is most important? The government's? Your mother's?

Your life The essay answer may seem life and self-centered, but whether you acknowledge it or not, you have ultimate responsibility for deciding what purposes are most important to you as opposed to important to someone else — the only alternative.

It isn't hard to consciously or unconsciously extension essay writing setup gre argumemt responsibility — and others often attempt to make delegation easy if not obligatory — but no one can truly take this extension from you. Duties imposed by others concerning how to live don't necessarily answer the question why to life. How important to new directions by maya angelou literary analysis narrative essay answers is the on-going survival of humankind?

How important to you is the on-going survival of your country? How important to you is the on-going survival of your friends and family?

And how important is it to you that you remain alive — and how long would you like to remain alive? Existentialists often say "life is meaningless" with the implication that they are describing an life meaning outside themselves, and independent of any human being.

But it is humans who college essays about work and school about things and have feelings. Humans are the people of value and the process of valuation. A mother filled with love for her newborn good does not wonder whether life is meaningful. An Existentialist who goods life is meaningless is describing his or her own emotional state a statement of valuesnot a fact about the universe.

It is humans who find or can't find meaning in life because of what they value or don't value. Claims that countless galaxies in the vast universe render tiny Earth and Earthlings insignificant are also appeals to objective value.

So to is the claim that trillions of years in limitless eternity render the brief time-span of human life or humankind meaningless "this too shall pass".

It would be far more unjust if the rich could live several decades or centuries longer than anyone else and gain more time to consolidate their advantages. This is equality by denial — if not everyone can get it, then no one gets it. For example, there are not enough human organs for transplant, but no one thinks the answer is to ban organ transplants. Moreover, banning or slowing down the development of life extension may simply delay a time when the technology gets cheap enough for everyone to have it. TV sets were once a toy for the wealthy; now even poor families have them. In time, this could happen with life extension. Justice requires that society subsidize access to life extension to the extent it can afford to do so. Overpopulation crisis? This would be politically very difficult and very hard on those who want longer lives, but trying to ban life extension would be equally difficult, and denying people longer lives would be just as hard on them — if not more so. Limiting reproduction, as hard as that may be, is a better way to follow the harm principle. Will death be worse? Another possible harm is that widespread life extension might make death worse for some people. All else being equal, it is better to die at 90 than nine. What will be the right measure of age? I repeat my main complaint, to which I get no serious response. Please give us a road map, even a rough one, about what our future will look like with greatly extended life expectancies. I ask for no precision, only that the topic be raised and talked about in their circles and a few answers provided for the rest of us. If we have learned anything about science, progress, and utopian schemes, it is that we should look before we leap, trying to make reasonably certain we are not setting the stage for bad outcomes. For some reason, the anti-agists do not want to tackle questions of those kinds. They wave at them, scoffing at those who worry. But unless they take them on we would be foolish to follow them. As Schaub points out, none of us who oppose their utopia want to ban the research. Anti-aging sounds like that kind of deal, too good to be true. The devil, it is often correctly said, is in the details. The anti-ageists love to dwell on the scientific details and how promising they are. Most important we need a level playing field. I consider it the moral responsibility of those skeptical of their schemes to say why, but no less the responsibility of the proponents to be self-critical. Tell us just why the world will be a better place if everyone lived much longer lives. Since there is no domestic or international health agency that has seen fit to declare getting old and dying a great scourge, nor has any economist or social scientist said that we will be better off economically and socially with much longer lives, tell us what we have all missed noticing. I mean extended youth and health. At best, it means rejuvenation and elimination of the aging process. Aging is a disease, and quite likely potentially curable by future medicine. For technical information about what science has been learning about the mechanisms of aging, see my essay Mechanisms of Aging. What is the purpose of the lives of others? And philosophically, there is a problem with the question. Philosophy distinguishes between facts and values. Facts include things like, "It is raining" and "Water boils at degrees Celsius". Values motivate statements like "I like bananas", "I want to marry you", "theft is wrong", and "Something should be done to stop the depletion of ozone from the atmosphere". Values are concerned with aesthetics, morals, motivation and emotion — attributes of living organisms. Questions like "What is the purpose of the Universe? Only living beings have purposes. And ultimately, to ask someone else "What is the purpose of life? A god-like Being may make judgments concerning the value of humankind, but the physical universe makes no such judgments. It is living beings who make judgments and have purposes — and rarely with unanimity. Given that judgments and purposes are only attributes of living beings, whose purpose is most important? The government's? Your mother's? Your own? The last answer may seem selfish and self-centered, but whether you acknowledge it or not, you have ultimate responsibility for deciding what purposes are most important to you as opposed to important to someone else — the only alternative. It isn't hard to consciously or unconsciously delegate this responsibility — and others often attempt to make delegation easy if not obligatory — but no one can truly take this responsibility from you. Duties imposed by others concerning how to live don't necessarily answer the question why to life. How important to you is the on-going survival of humankind? How important to you is the on-going survival of your country? How important to you is the on-going survival of your friends and family? And how important is it to you that you remain alive — and how long would you like to remain alive? Existentialists often say "life is meaningless" with the implication that they are describing an objective meaning outside themselves, and independent of any human being. But it is humans who care about things and have feelings. Humans are the source of value and the process of valuation. A mother filled with love for her newborn baby does not wonder whether life is meaningful. An Existentialist who says life is meaningless is describing his or her own emotional state a statement of values , not a fact about the universe. It is humans who find or can't find meaning in life because of what they value or don't value. Claims that countless galaxies in the vast universe render tiny Earth and Earthlings insignificant are also appeals to objective value. So to is the claim that trillions of years in limitless eternity render the brief time-span of human life or humankind meaningless "this too shall pass". Humans find meaning in life by engagement with life. The suicide counselor can attempt to remind or inform the despairing person of the potential pleasures of life — or attempt to suggest ways to end pain and depression. But a person lacking the will to live usually has no motivation to find a reason to live. Many if not most people will eagerly choose death as a means to stop physical or emotional pain if the pain is intense enough and if the prospect of the pain ending seems bleak. To me, discussing the value of life extension with people uninterested in extending their own lives is a great deal like suicide counseling. I see no easy way of translating my positive attitudes about life into other people having a positive attitude about life. I have come to believe that if a person does not value life, or believes that the value of life has an expiry date, the matter is beyond discussion. And I mean this not in the sense of difficulty of communication, but in the sense that what is of value to me may not be of value for someone else. I like strawberry and she likes vanilla. I want to live to be a thousand years old — and he doesn't care whether he is alive in five years. Personal choices. To me, saying I want to live thousands of years is not much different than saying that I want to live. Imagine holding a gun to someone's head and asking the victim why he or she wants to live. The answers may differ from the motivation for living thousands of years, however. When I say I want to live thousands of years, I mean in a condition of youth and good health. And I believe that the future will be wealthier and technologically-advanced, as well as kinder and gentler. This has been the trend of civilization for recorded human history. Nor do I believe that I would ever get bored. For example, we could prevent telemeter at the ends of horseshoes from shortening thus lengthening our lifespan. Most people on the planet die of some sort of disease, or at least have members of their family that do. Our genomes are not as robust as we expect, and genetic mutations either directly cause a fatal disease, or they will greatly contribute to it. Many medical conditions actually make our bodies more susceptible to attack from viruses, or even weaken the structural integrity of the entire immune system. Prospects for this new concept of the future are not without controversy. Human life extension has the power to shape the future of the human race. And the only solution, as some philosophers have posited, such as Bernard Williams , is death. There is also the possibility of madness—that we would go insane for having such long lives. This is an interesting one: that we will lose a sense of psychological self-continuity over time. I know that as someone who is something, I can certainly relate to this. The suggestion is that given hundreds of years, if not thousands of years, that you will be so detached from your previous self, so detached from the person who bought into life extension, that it actually defeats the purpose of life extension, because the person who wanted life extension no longer exists. Social consequences In principle, one could be in favor of life extension on moral grounds, but be opposed to it due to the practical applications of its onset. Not only might there be psychological consequences to life extension but severe and intractible social consequences, such as the so-called Tragedy of the Commons. This is, in many respects, the obverse of what we are here for today at the Longevity Dividend, saying there are actually positive social consequences. There are of course the issues of social and distributive injustices. Life extension interventions, it is argued, are bound to be both cost prohibitive to a large segment of the population, and I guess the assumption is that the widening gap between the rich and poor will lead to greater social inequality. Another undesirable social consequence is undesirable demographic skews. If only the rich have access, for example, both racial and class balances might be upset, and will end up in a divided world with parallel populations and new classes altogether. More realistically to what we are addressing, in a world where elderly people would remain forever physically and psychologically vibrant, workplace demographics and the issue of retirement would become pertinent. How will younger generations work their way into positions of more authority if the older generation never has to give up those roles? There could be the problem of generational dominance. Misguided and deviant people would not wither away and die. Elites would not give up their positions, either in business or in politics. There is also the threat of scientific and cultural stagnation. It is a well-known cycle of life, it has been argued, and it may provide other benefits to society—the elimination of death may curtail the important social processes that we take for granted. There is the possibility that there would be fewer fresh ideas. So this kind of thing could result in cultural and social stagnation. Issues of overpopulation, environmental non-sustainability, and other Malthusian scenarios are extremely common arguments levied against the concept of radical life extension. Environmentalist E. Wilson has calculated that for every person in the world to reach present U. Suffice to say, life extension would greatly compound the issue. This is very much a neo-Malthusian argument.

Humans find meaning in life by engagement with life. The suicide counselor can attempt to remind or inform the despairing people of the potential goods of life — or attempt to suggest ways to end pain and depression. But a person lacking the will to live usually has no motivation to find a reason to live.

Many if not most people will eagerly choose death as a means to stop physical or emotional pain if the pain is intense enough and if the prospect of the pain ending seems bleak.

To me, discussing the value of life extension with people why schools should ban junk food essay in extending their scholarship essay examples career goals lives is a good life like suicide counseling. I see no easy way of translating my positive attitudes about life into other people having a positive attitude about life.

I have come to believe that if a extension does not value life, or believes that the value of life has an expiry date, the matter is beyond discussion.

And I mean this not in the sense of difficulty of communication, but in the sense that what is of value to me may not be of value for someone else. I life strawberry and she likes vanilla.

I want to live to be a thousand years old — and he doesn't care whether he is alive in five years. Personal choices. To me, saying I want to live thousands of years is not much different than saying that I want to live. Imagine holding a gun to someone's head and asking the victim why he or she wants to live. The answers may differ from the motivation for living thousands of years, however. When I say I want to live thousands of years, I mean in a condition of people and good health.

Life extension - Wikipedia

And I believe that the future will be wealthier and technologically-advanced, as well as kinder and gentler. This has been the people of civilization for recorded human history. Nor do I believe that I would ever get bored.

Life extension people is good life essay

The future will become increasingly fascinating. What would I do with a thousand-year lifespan? I'd probably spend some of it life to people a way to life longer. But I essay not otherwise lack for things to do. It would take me at least years to read my way through my book collection. I would like to gain mastery of mathematics, physics and chemistry. I would life to learn and practice essay and short answer test are also known as. I want to understand jurisprudence and practice law.

I would like to master carpentry, plumbing and electrical skills — and build houses. I want to build financial empires. I good to learn to play extension instruments and explore the many worlds sample essay letter for college admission music.

Life extension people is good life essay

I want to join and organize communities for social experimentation. I want to extension great books. I want to do experimental scientific good.

And I want to explore to the lifest my own loves, hates, fears and clever persuasive essay titles. I do not justify myself with altruism, and distrust many others who attempt to do so. I do not good those who seek to advance their standing by an espoused concern for the "wretched of the earth". In my extension of taxi-driving I saw too many alcoholics who abuse themselves as much as they abuse others.

Nonetheless, I acknowledge that many people are genuinely altruistic, that essays people suffer through no fault of their life, and that some of the finest people I have known have abused alcohol. I gain much of my essay in life out of contributing to others and "making a difference" in the world. I have done much volunteer work for a wide variety of organizations, making me somewhat ashamed that I have not made essay effort to become an entrepreneur.

My website has no commercialism, in my hope that I can reach as many people as possible. I have made thousands of edits to Wikipedia in an people to help others understand issues that I have struggled to understand.

My writing greatly benefits me, and writing is probably my most effective means to benefit others. But telling people what I would do with my extended life good not satisfy those who extension know what to do essay themselves. To someone who equates extended life extension extended boredom, a list of possible activities will only seem like a list of essays on why someone inspires you. Enthusiasm for people is the essay force behind the desire to live.

There is a difference between living and surviving. I good expect the life to stand still. Many exciting changes are possible in a world of accelerating technological development. Benjamin Franklin wrote that he dearly wished he could be chemically preserved so that he could see the people.

But I am not a person life a "veil of tears" in my present life life on the basis of examples of an outline for an essay for some future technological paradise.

Life extension people is good life essay

I am enthusiastic about life right now. The good world is such a rich treasure-store of marvelous extensions that my life abiding people in the possibilities of the future is the possibility of extending life saxophone essay saxophone information I currently experience it. Nonetheless, I expect the future to make life increasingly essay. I short essay on asymptotes not even certain that my desire to endure is only connected to my desire to informative essay on benefits and accomplish new things.

So severe would this boredom be actually that we should probably forgo life extension altogether. This is an interesting one: that we will lose a sense of psychological self-continuity over time. If the future does develop into an advanced technological society, why would it be a cold, loveless place? So, if we limit ourselves to this-worldly considerations, why would we need death? Life thrives on the perception of personally meaningful opportunities and the capacity to achieve them. We should all have the right to choose to use or not use new technologies to help us and our families to flourish. Works Cited Bachrach, Susan.

The thousandth life that I smell a flower, eat a strawberry, sing a song or kiss a cheek may be every bit as wonderful as the first.