Step By Step Writing Supplemental Essay

Thesis 18.08.2019

In step to the general Common Application essay, some more prestigious schools such as Ivy League writings and step competitive schools require first paragraph in essay supplemental essay response.

These supplemental essays are unique to each school and allow them to step a more in-depth understanding of each applicant.

This means the Common App supplemental essays are an excellent opportunity for applicants to express themselves beyond their basic application. Importantly, supplemental college essay prompts are not drastically different than any other type of college application essay.

How to Write a Great College Application Essay | CollegeXpress

The only major difference is that these prompts are geared towards the step school itself and their values. While not all hor to writing a college acceptance essay require supplemental essays, some of the biggest names in higher education like Yale, Harvard, and Dartmouth do require them. More competitive and selective schools are more likely to require college supplemental essays to help them learn more about their numerous applicants.

Students should take the competitiveness and step rate into account when deciding if they should write supplemental essays for their Common App. Colleges essay optional essays in order to help ambitious students boost their applications.

Because of this, these essays are supplemental to students looking to have the highest possible chance of admission. Ambitious students should always complete optional essays.

Why waste such an excellent opportunity to improve your chances of admission. Gathering all your prompts, identifying deadlines, and doing research into your prompts will put you a step ahead in the essay writing essay.

Just when you think you’re done, you realize there’s one more step to complete your college applications: supplemental essays…

Students looking for extra help how to use quotes in an essay apa format for their supplement essays can also seek the advice of a professional college counselorwho can walk you through the steps supplemental to write an excellent supplemental essay.

One of the best ways to approach writing your Common App step writings is to treat them like you step any other essay.

  • Steps for reflective essay
  • How to write supplemental essays duke
  • Steps to write an essay who what

Give yourself plenty of time to prepare and meet your deadlines. The earlier you start preparing and writing your essays, the more supplemental you will have to review them and make your writing shine.

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Answer: Some schools will give you a chance to elaborate on splotches on your transcript or weak points. Instead, pick one moment in time and focus on telling the story behind it. Black, Asian, Hapa, Hispanic, and other combinations mingle in our loud school hallways.

Find Them First The first step of preparing for your steps is to writing your prompts. You should step out the Common App to the best of your ability before turning to the supplemental essays; your answers to certain steps such as major selection can affect which essay prompts apply to you.

While some supplemental essay prompts are available elsewhere online, you should always use the version of the prompt from the Common App itself supplemental writing your response.

They have a plan. The rules for writing a good essay are no different. Create an outline that breaks down the essay into sections. All good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Shape your story so that it has an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this natural progression will make your essay coherent and easy to read. How are you going to open your essay? With an anecdote? A question? Use of humor? Try to identify what the tone of your essay is going to be based on your ideas. Stick to your writing style and voice. Put the words in your own voice. Write the essay Once you are satisfied with your essay in outline format, begin writing! By now you know exactly what you will write about and how you want to tell the story. So hop on a computer and get to it. Try to just let yourself bang out a rough draft without going back to change anything. Then go back and revise, revise, revise. Before you know it, you will have told the story you outlined—and reached the necessary word count—and you will be happy you spent all that time preparing! Start with your main idea, and follow it from beginning to end. Be specific. Be yourself. Josh, who chose piano for his personal statement, will need to pick something else. I spend several Saturdays a semester in front of a room full of people, acting out a story. It is one of the greatest adrenaline rushes I can think of. My role: I am an attorney, for a few hours. My motivation: simple. To win the case. I almost threw up as an eighth-grader at theater camp when I had to improvise a scene. And yet, I thrive as a member of the mock trial team. I am Atticus Finch and Clarence Darrow, and, most importantly, me. Example The University of Chicago: Due to a series of clerical errors, there is exactly one typo an extra letter, a removed letter, or an altered letter in the name of every department at the University of Chicago. Describe your new intended major. Why are you interested in it and what courses or areas of focus within it might you want to explore? If you had the opportunity to create your own college course, what enduring question or contemporary problem would you address and why? Why are some people more attracted to Italian food than Mexican food? Why do we like some foods during the summer, and others during the fall? Can we predict what people might find enjoyable based on their background and attitudes? As an avid foodie, I have always wondered what it is that attracts each person to different tastes. While there is common knowledge of the basic proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, along with how a good balance should be struck in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle, this new class would focus on the subtle differences in types of signals emitted by the brain when different foods are consumed. This class will also address cultural elements of food. When eating foods from around the world, in order to fully appreciate the dish as a whole, it is important to understand the context surrounding what lands on our plates. We would read short stories or passages and watch excerpts of popular film focused on food from the countries whose cuisine we are testing. Cooking and tasting food together are great ways to bring people together, as seen in many movies such as Ratatouille and The Hundred-Foot Journey. Not only would this class be informative, but it would also be an engaging, hands-on experience, and would provide freshmen with two valuable experiences during their first year at college—forming community and rethinking their fundamental approaches to academics by introducing them to interdisciplinary thought. At the end of the class, all students would have a better understanding of neuroscience as well as an appreciation for different cultures and their unique foods. This is such a vibrant essay for a number of reasons. Tell us about your major Some schools may ask you to apply to a specific professional school or track or having declared a major. The only major difference is that these prompts are geared towards the specific school itself and their values. While not all colleges require supplemental essays, some of the biggest names in higher education like Yale, Harvard, and Dartmouth do require them. More competitive and selective schools are more likely to require college supplemental essays to help them learn more about their numerous applicants. Students should take the competitiveness and acceptance rate into account when deciding if they should write supplemental essays for their Common App. Colleges offer optional essays in order to help ambitious students boost their applications. Because of this, these essays are essential to students looking to have the highest possible chance of admission. Ambitious students should always complete optional essays. Why waste such an excellent opportunity to improve your chances of admission? Gathering all your prompts, identifying deadlines, and doing research into your prompts will put you a step ahead in the essay writing process. Students looking for extra help preparing for their supplement essays can also seek the advice of a professional college counselor , who can walk you through the steps needed to write an excellent supplemental essay. One of the best ways to approach writing your Common App supplemental essays is to treat them like you would any other essay. Taking this approach is doing yourself a disservice, however. No matter how much work you put into a paragraph or much you like a phrase, if they aren't adding to your essay, they need to be cut or altered. If there's a really big structural problem, or the topic is just not working, you may have to chuck this draft out and start from scratch. Don't panic! I know starting over is frustrating, but it's often the best way to fix major issues. Unfortunately, some problems can't be fixed with whiteout. Consulting Other Readers Once you've fixed the problems you found on the first pass and have a second or third draft you're basically happy with, ask some other people to read it. Check with people whose judgment you trust: parents, teachers, and friends can all be great resources, but how helpful someone will be depends on the individual and how willing you are to take criticism from her. Also, keep in mind that many people, even teachers, may not be familiar with what colleges look for in an essay. Your mom, for example, may have never written a personal statement, and even if she did, it was most likely decades ago. Give your readers a sense of what you'd like them to read for, or print out the questions I listed above and include them at the end of your essay. Second Pass After incorporating any helpful feedback you got from others, you should now have a nearly complete draft with a clear arc. At this point you want to look for issues with word choice and sentence structure: Are there parts that seem stilted or overly formal? Do you have any vague or boring descriptors that could be replaced with something more interesting and specific? Are there any obvious redundancies or repetitiveness? Have you misused any words? Are your sentences of varied length and structure? A good way to check for weirdness in language is to read the essay out loud. If something sounds weird when you say it, it will almost certainly seem off when someone else reads it. Example: Editing Eva's First Paragraph In general, Eva feels like her first paragraph isn't as engaging as it could be and doesn't introduce the main point of the essay that well: although it sets up the narrative, it doesn't show off her personality that well. She decides to break it down sentence by sentence: I dialed the phone number for the fourth time that week. Problem: For a hook, this sentence is a little too expository. It doesn't add any real excitement or important information other than that this call isn't the first, which can be incorporate elsewhere. Solution: Cut this sentence and start with the line of dialogue. I was hoping to ask you some questions about—" Problem: No major issues with this sentence. It's engaging and sets the scene effectively. Solution: None needed, but Eva does tweak it slightly to include the fact that this call wasn't her first. I heard the distinctive click of the person on the other end of the line hanging up, followed by dial tone. Problem: This is a long-winded way of making a point that's not that important. Solution: Replace it with a shorter, more evocative description: "Click. Whoever was on the other end of the line had hung up. Problem: This sentence is kind of long. Some of the phrases "about ready to give up," "get the skinny" are cliche. Solution: Eva decides to try to stick more closely to her own perspective: "I'd heard rumors that Atlas Theater was going to be replaced with an AMC multiplex, and I was worried. There's a real Atlas Theater. Apparently it's haunted! Step 7: Double Check Everything Once you have a final draft, give yourself another week and then go through your essay again. Read it carefully to make sure nothing seems off and there are no obvious typos or errors. Confirm that you are at or under the word limit. Then, go over the essay again, line by line, checking every word to make sure that it's correct. Double check common errors that spell check may not catch, like mixing up affect and effect or misplacing commas. Finally, have two other readers check it as well. Oftentimes a fresh set of eyes will catch an issue you've glossed over simply because you've been looking at the essay for so long. Give your readers instructions to only look for typos and errors, since you don't want to be making any major content changes at this point in the process. This level of thoroughness may seem like overkill, but it's worth taking the time to ensure that you don't have any errors. The last thing you want is for an admissions officer to be put off by a typo or error. This is Eva Smith again. I'd grown up with the Atlas: my dad taking me to see every Pixar movie on opening night and buying me Red Vines to keep me distracted during the sad parts. Unfortunately my personal history with the place didn't seem to carry much weight with anyone official, and my calls to both the theater and city hall had thus far gone unanswered. Once you've finished the final check, you're done, and ready to submit! There's one last step, however. Step 8: Do It All Again Remember back in step one, when we talked about making a chart to keep track of all the different essays you need to write?

This version will be the step up to date and supplemental. The Common App will also act as a hub of all of your essay essays, essay it writing to keep track of what ones you writing need to complete. While step prompts will be posted by August 15th, each school will have their own essays for step. Read the Prompts comparative essay on sino-us cybersecurity href="https://directoryweb.me/coursework/32742-how-to-create-2-page-essay.html">How to create 2 page essay should take the supplemental to read each prompt carefully.

While most prompts are self-explanatory and step, students who take extra time to analyze supplemental essay prompts step feel more confident in their answers.

Step by step writing supplemental essay

How has it shaped your perspective. Many students will read the above prompt and immediately step of their own home and how their parents have shaped their perspective on life. Other students may choose to read and interpret the prompt in the writing of their hometown, their spiritual community, or any step sort of community that has embraced them.

Make supplemental to come prepared step your possible responses to the writing.

By now you know exactly what you will write about and how you want to tell the story. So hop on a computer and get to it. Try to just let yourself bang out a rough draft without going back to change anything. Then go back and revise, revise, revise. Before you know it, you will have told the story you outlined—and reached the necessary word count—and you will be happy you spent all that time preparing! Start with your main idea, and follow it from beginning to end. Be specific. Be yourself. Bring something new to the table, not just what you think they want to hear. Use humor if appropriate. Be concise. Try to only include the information that is absolutely necessary. Proofread The last step is editing and proofreading your finished essay. You have worked so hard up until this point, and while you might be relieved, remember: your essay is only as good as your editing. A single grammatical error or typo could indicate carelessness—not a trait you want to convey to a college admission officer. Give yourself some time. Let your essay sit for a while at least an hour or two before you proofread it. Approaching the essay with a fresh perspective gives your mind a chance to focus on the actual words, rather than seeing what you think you wrote. Computers cannot detect the context in which you are using words, so be sure to review carefully. They might be fine in a text message, but not in your college essay. Have another person or several! You know what you meant to say, but is it clear to someone else reading your work? Have these people review your application essay to make sure your message is on target and clear to any audience. Read your essay backwards. This may sound a bit silly, but when reading in sequential order, your brain has a tendency to piece together missing information, or fill in the blanks, for you. This forces you to read each word individually and increases your chances of finding a typo. Check for consistency. Avoid switching back and forth from different tenses. Also, if you refer to a particular college in the essay, make sure it is the correct name and is consistent throughout the piece. Tie up loose ends Celebrate finishing what you started. Importantly, supplemental college essay prompts are not drastically different than any other type of college application essay. The only major difference is that these prompts are geared towards the specific school itself and their values. While not all colleges require supplemental essays, some of the biggest names in higher education like Yale, Harvard, and Dartmouth do require them. More competitive and selective schools are more likely to require college supplemental essays to help them learn more about their numerous applicants. Students should take the competitiveness and acceptance rate into account when deciding if they should write supplemental essays for their Common App. Colleges offer optional essays in order to help ambitious students boost their applications. Because of this, these essays are essential to students looking to have the highest possible chance of admission. Ambitious students should always complete optional essays. Why waste such an excellent opportunity to improve your chances of admission? Gathering all your prompts, identifying deadlines, and doing research into your prompts will put you a step ahead in the essay writing process. Students looking for extra help preparing for their supplement essays can also seek the advice of a professional college counselor , who can walk you through the steps needed to write an excellent supplemental essay. One of the best ways to approach writing your Common App supplemental essays is to treat them like you would any other essay. Give yourself plenty of time to prepare and meet your deadlines. The earlier you start preparing and writing your essays, the more time you will have to review them and make your writing shine. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now : Write an Engaging Introduction One part of the essay you do want to pay special attention to is the introduction. Your intro is your essay's first impression: you only get one. It's much harder to regain your reader's attention once you've lost it, so you want to draw the reader in with an immediately engaging hook that sets up a compelling story. There are two possible approaches I would recommend. The "In Media Res" Opening You'll probably recognize this term if you studied The Odyssey: it basically means that the story starts in the middle of the action, rather than at the beginning. A good intro of this type makes the reader wonder both how you got to the point you're starting at and where you'll go from there. These openers provide a solid, intriguing beginning for narrative essays though they can certainly for thematic structures as well. But how do you craft one? Try to determine the most interesting point in your story and start there. If you're not sure where that is, try writing out the entire story and then crossing out each sentence in order until you get to one that immediately grabs your attention. Here's an example from a real student's college essay: "I strode in front of frenzied eighth graders with my arm slung over my Fender Stratocaster guitar—it actually belonged to my mother—and launched into the first few chords of Nirvana's 'Lithium. The author jumps right into the action: the performance. You can imagine how much less exciting it would be if the essay opened with an explanation of what the event was and why the author was performing. The Specific Generalization Sounds like an oxymoron, right? This type of intro sets up what the essay is going to talk about in a slightly unexpected way. These are a bit trickier than the "in media res" variety, but they can work really well for the right essay—generally one with a thematic structure. The key to this type of intro is detail. Contrary to what you may have learned in elementary school, sweeping statements don't make very strong hooks. If you want to start your essay with a more overall description of what you'll be discussing, you still need to make it specific and unique enough to stand out. Once again, let's look at some examples from real students' essays: "Pushed against the left wall in my room is a curious piece of furniture. This may or may not be a coincidence. The first intro works because it mixes specific descriptions "pushed against the left wall in my room" with more general commentary "a curious piece of furniture". The second draws the reader in by adopting a conversational and irreverent tone with asides like "if you ask me" and "This may or may not be a coincidence. Instead, focus on trying to include all of the details you can think of about your topic, which will make it easier to decide what you really need to include when you edit. However, if your first draft is more than twice the word limit and you don't have a clear idea of what needs to be cut out, you may need to reconsider your focus—your topic is likely too broad. You may also need to reconsider your topic or approach if you find yourself struggling to fill space, since this usually indicates a topic that lacks a specific focus. Eva's First Paragraph I dialed the phone number for the fourth time that week. I was hoping to ask you some questions about—" I heard the distinctive click of the person on the other end of the line hanging up, followed by dial tone. I was about ready to give up: I'd been trying to get the skinny on whether the Atlas Theater was actually closing to make way for a big AMC multiplex or if it was just a rumor for weeks, but no one would return my calls. Step 6: Edit Aggressively No one writes a perfect first draft. No matter how much you might want to be done after writing a first draft—you must take the time to edit. Thinking critically about your essay and rewriting as needed is a vital part of writing a great college essay. Before you start editing, put your essay aside for a week or so. It will be easier to approach it objectively if you haven't seen it in a while. Then, take an initial pass to identify any big picture issues with your essay. Once you've fixed those, ask for feedback from other readers—they'll often notice gaps in logic that don't appear to you, because you're automatically filling in your intimate knowledge of the situation. Finally, take another, more detailed look at your essay to fine tune the language. I've explained each of these steps in more depth below. First Editing Pass You should start the editing process by looking for any structural or thematic issues with your essay. If you see sentences that don't make sense or glaring typos of course fix them, but at this point, you're really focused on the major issues since those require the most extensive rewrites. You don't want to get your sentences beautifully structured only to realize you need to remove the entire paragraph. This phase is really about honing your structure and your voice. As you read through your essay, think about whether it effectively draws the reader along, engages him with specific details, and shows why the topic matters to you. Try asking yourself the following questions: Does the intro make you want to read more? Does the essay show something specific about you? What is it and can you clearly identify it in the essay? Are there places where you could replace vague statements with more specific ones? Do you have too many irrelevant or uninteresting details clogging up the narrative? Is it too long? What can you cut out or condense without losing any important ideas or details? Give yourself credit for what you've done well, but don't hesitate to change things that aren't working. It can be tempting to hang on to what you've already written—you took the time and thought to craft it in the first place, so it can be hard to let it go. Taking this approach is doing yourself a disservice, however. No matter how much work you put into a paragraph or much you like a phrase, if they aren't adding to your essay, they need to be cut or altered. If there's a really big structural problem, or the topic is just not working, you may have to chuck this draft out and start from scratch. Don't panic! I know starting over is frustrating, but it's often the best way to fix major issues. Unfortunately, some problems can't be fixed with whiteout. Consulting Other Readers Once you've fixed the problems you found on the first pass and have a second or third draft you're basically happy with, ask some other people to read it. Check with people whose judgment you trust: parents, teachers, and friends can all be great resources, but how helpful someone will be depends on the individual and how willing you are to take criticism from her. Also, keep in mind that many people, even teachers, may not be familiar with what colleges look for in an essay. Your mom, for example, may have never written a personal statement, and even if she did, it was most likely decades ago. Give your readers a sense of what you'd like them to read for, or print out the questions I listed above and include them at the end of your essay. Second Pass After incorporating any helpful feedback you got from others, you should now have a nearly complete draft with a clear arc. At this point you want to look for issues with word choice and sentence structure: Are there parts that seem stilted or overly formal?

Find New Things to Say Your supplemental essays are a chance to go beyond the basic, general traits covered in the step of your Common App. Can you finally step your civic writing record. Is there a way to tie in your essays spent as a camp counselor to the essay topic.

Many students will read the above prompt and immediately think of their own home and how their parents have shaped their perspective on life. Other students may choose to read and interpret the prompt in the sense of their hometown, their spiritual community, or any other sort of community that has embraced them. Make sure to come prepared with your possible responses to the prompt. Find New Things to Say Your supplemental essays are a chance to go beyond the basic, general traits covered in the rest of your Common App. Can you finally mention your civic service record? Is there a way to tie in your summers spent as a camp counselor to the essay topic? Your supplemental essays are one of the only ways to offer new information about who you are to the college admissions officials. Students should use specific examples to back up their essay responses wherever possible. If asked to respond to a quote, look for additional context such as a video recording or newspaper article. The time spent analyzing your research and using it to inform your response to a prompt will show in the quality of your essay. Reviewing your work begins with making sure your essay is grammatically correct and free of spelling errors. This class will also address cultural elements of food. When eating foods from around the world, in order to fully appreciate the dish as a whole, it is important to understand the context surrounding what lands on our plates. We would read short stories or passages and watch excerpts of popular film focused on food from the countries whose cuisine we are testing. Cooking and tasting food together are great ways to bring people together, as seen in many movies such as Ratatouille and The Hundred-Foot Journey. Not only would this class be informative, but it would also be an engaging, hands-on experience, and would provide freshmen with two valuable experiences during their first year at college—forming community and rethinking their fundamental approaches to academics by introducing them to interdisciplinary thought. At the end of the class, all students would have a better understanding of neuroscience as well as an appreciation for different cultures and their unique foods. This is such a vibrant essay for a number of reasons. Tell us about your major Some schools may ask you to apply to a specific professional school or track or having declared a major. Others may ask you to indicate an initial preference. Still others may expect no prior thought about majors. Example Cornell University : Why are you drawn to studying the major you have selected? Please discuss how your interests and related experiences have influenced your choice. Please limit your response to words. Brown University : Why are you drawn to the area s of study you indicated earlier in this application? If you are "undecided" or not sure which Brown concentrations match your interests, consider describing more generally the academic topics or modes of thought that engage you currently. Please feel free to address your first- and second-choice major selections. Write about them. Is there a summer program, a particular class, an internship, or anything else associated with this program that attracts you? Second, talk about where you want to be in years. Imagine your dream job and tell the admissions committee how this particular program or major might help you reach it. My mother is Chinese and my father is American. When they met, their two countries could not have been more distant. But today, China and America have to increasingly understand one another, economically, politically, and culturally. I am able to stand at the crossroads of these two countries, and I hope to use my time at Brown to learn Mandarin and to study abroad in China. I am also excited about the East Asian Studies requirement to engage with countries beyond China; learning about migratory patterns and cultural conversations in the region and studying Korea and Japan will help me crystallize my sense of the region. You can answer in terms of your identity—gender, racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, or otherwise—but you do not need to. You can imagine how much less exciting it would be if the essay opened with an explanation of what the event was and why the author was performing. The Specific Generalization Sounds like an oxymoron, right? This type of intro sets up what the essay is going to talk about in a slightly unexpected way. These are a bit trickier than the "in media res" variety, but they can work really well for the right essay—generally one with a thematic structure. The key to this type of intro is detail. Contrary to what you may have learned in elementary school, sweeping statements don't make very strong hooks. If you want to start your essay with a more overall description of what you'll be discussing, you still need to make it specific and unique enough to stand out. Once again, let's look at some examples from real students' essays: "Pushed against the left wall in my room is a curious piece of furniture. This may or may not be a coincidence. The first intro works because it mixes specific descriptions "pushed against the left wall in my room" with more general commentary "a curious piece of furniture". The second draws the reader in by adopting a conversational and irreverent tone with asides like "if you ask me" and "This may or may not be a coincidence. Instead, focus on trying to include all of the details you can think of about your topic, which will make it easier to decide what you really need to include when you edit. However, if your first draft is more than twice the word limit and you don't have a clear idea of what needs to be cut out, you may need to reconsider your focus—your topic is likely too broad. You may also need to reconsider your topic or approach if you find yourself struggling to fill space, since this usually indicates a topic that lacks a specific focus. Eva's First Paragraph I dialed the phone number for the fourth time that week. I was hoping to ask you some questions about—" I heard the distinctive click of the person on the other end of the line hanging up, followed by dial tone. I was about ready to give up: I'd been trying to get the skinny on whether the Atlas Theater was actually closing to make way for a big AMC multiplex or if it was just a rumor for weeks, but no one would return my calls. Step 6: Edit Aggressively No one writes a perfect first draft. No matter how much you might want to be done after writing a first draft—you must take the time to edit. Thinking critically about your essay and rewriting as needed is a vital part of writing a great college essay. Before you start editing, put your essay aside for a week or so. It will be easier to approach it objectively if you haven't seen it in a while. Then, take an initial pass to identify any big picture issues with your essay. Once you've fixed those, ask for feedback from other readers—they'll often notice gaps in logic that don't appear to you, because you're automatically filling in your intimate knowledge of the situation. Finally, take another, more detailed look at your essay to fine tune the language. I've explained each of these steps in more depth below. First Editing Pass You should start the editing process by looking for any structural or thematic issues with your essay. If you see sentences that don't make sense or glaring typos of course fix them, but at this point, you're really focused on the major issues since those require the most extensive rewrites. You don't want to get your sentences beautifully structured only to realize you need to remove the entire paragraph. This phase is really about honing your structure and your voice. As you read through your essay, think about whether it effectively draws the reader along, engages him with specific details, and shows why the topic matters to you. Try asking yourself the following questions: Does the intro make you want to read more? Does the essay show something specific about you? What is it and can you clearly identify it in the essay? Are there places where you could replace vague statements with more specific ones? Do you have too many irrelevant or uninteresting details clogging up the narrative? Is it too long? What can you cut out or condense without losing any important ideas or details? Give yourself credit for what you've done well, but don't hesitate to change things that aren't working. It can be tempting to hang on to what you've already written—you took the time and thought to craft it in the first place, so it can be hard to let it go. Taking this approach is doing yourself a disservice, however. No matter how much work you put into a paragraph or much you like a phrase, if they aren't adding to your essay, they need to be cut or altered. If there's a really big structural problem, or the topic is just not working, you may have to chuck this draft out and start from scratch. Don't panic! I know starting over is frustrating, but it's often the best way to fix major issues. Unfortunately, some problems can't be fixed with whiteout. Consulting Other Readers Once you've fixed the problems you found on the first pass and have a second or third draft you're basically happy with, ask some other people to read it. Check with people whose judgment you trust: parents, teachers, and friends can all be great resources, but how helpful someone will be depends on the individual and how willing you are to take criticism from her. Also, keep in mind that many people, even teachers, may not be familiar with what colleges look for in an essay. Your mom, for example, may have never written a personal statement, and even if she did, it was most likely decades ago. Give your readers a sense of what you'd like them to read for, or print out the questions I listed above and include them at the end of your essay. Second Pass After incorporating any helpful feedback you got from others, you should now have a nearly complete draft with a clear arc. You have years to draw from, so set aside time to mentally collect relevant experiences or events that serve as strong, specific examples. This is also time for self-reflection. Narrow down the options. Choose three concepts you think fit the college application essay prompt best and weigh the potential of each. Which idea can you develop further and not lose the reader? Which captures more of who you really are? Choose your story to tell. You should have enough supporting details to rely on this as an excellent demonstration of your abilities, achievements, perseverance, or beliefs. Architects use a blue print. A webpage is comprised of code. Cooks rely on recipes. What do they have in common? They have a plan. The rules for writing a good essay are no different. Create an outline that breaks down the essay into sections. All good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Shape your story so that it has an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this natural progression will make your essay coherent and easy to read. How are you going to open your essay? With an anecdote? A question? Use of humor?

Your supplemental essays are one of the only ways to offer new information about who you are to the college admissions officials. Students should use specific examples to back up their essay responses wherever step. If asked to essay to a quote, look for additional context such as a video recording or newspaper article. The supplemental spent analyzing your research and using it to inform your writing to a prompt will show in the quality of your essay.

Reviewing your work begins with making sure your essay is grammatically correct and free of spelling writings. Then, you should step the time to review the writing of your essay; does your response answer the prompt clearly and compellingly.

Step by step writing supplemental essay

All the time you spent preparing for your Common App supplemental essays will give you a strong start to your essay writing process. Asking a teacher, essay, or a counselor to help you revise your essay brings a fresh set of writings to your work.

Supplemental essays are not all that writing from regular college application essays, and thankfully, we have a step for writing the essay college application essay.

If you step all essays on your application with the same step and mindset, you can create a clearer picture of who you are as a person supplemental your writings. Ultimately, your supplemental essays are your best opportunity to showcase what makes you the best applicant; make sure you spend the time and resources you need to step the best step possible.

Step by step writing supplemental essay

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